Archive | wildlife

Upcoming lectures focus on NH forests, loons, and then geology

The annual Cottrell-Baldwin Environmental Lecture Series is underway at the Caroline A. Fox Research and Demonstration Forest, 309 Center Road, Hillsborough. The upcoming lectures take place from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. and are open to the public free of charge.

  • Tuesday, March 26: “The Original Forests of New Hampshire” by Charles Cogsbill, forest ecologist and co-author of “The Changing Nature of the Maine Woods”
  • Tuesday, April 2: “New Hampshire’s Loons” by Harry Vogel, senior biologist and executive director of the Loon Preservation Committee
  • Tuesday, April 9: “More than Granite…An Introduction to New Hampshire’s Geology” by Frederick “Rick” Chormann, New Hampshire state geologist

More information is available via the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests event page: From the Ground Up.

The lecture series is co-sponsored by the Forest Society and New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.

Birds of Wendell Marsh South slideshow and hike on Aug. 30

Birds of Wendell Marsh South, a slideshow and hike led by Steve Hale of Open Word Explorers, will be held on Thursday, August 30, in Sunapee. The presentation starts at 5:30 pm at the Abbott Library. A hike of Wendell Marsh South follows at 7:00 pm. The program sponsors are the Ausbon Sargent Land Preservation Trust and Abbott Library. For sign up information, visit Abbott Library. RSVP by August 28.

Land protection: Wendell Marsh in Sunapee

The protection of the Wendell Marsh area in Sunapee has been a focus of the conservation efforts for many years. Earlier this summer (June 2018), the Ausbon Sargent Land Preservation Trust announced that 40 acres of undeveloped land, which includes a significant portion of the marsh habitat, had been preserved.

NH Fish and Game began the conservation efforts in this area in the 1960’s. They protected the 10-acre Wendell Marsh Wildlife Area, identified as a high priority for conservation by the Town of Sunapee due to its pristine wetland habitat for waterfowl, wading birds, and other wildlife, as well as for water quality protection.

In 2013 Ausbon Sargent partnered with the Town of Sunapee’s Conservation Commission to protect 136 acres (Wendell Marsh North) followed, in 2015, with an additional 143 acres (Wendell Marsh South.) Read more…

 

Saving Special Places conference to be held April 7 in Alton

Saving Special Places, New Hampshire’s annual land conservation conference will be held on Saturday, April 7, 2018, at Prospect Mountain High School in Alton. This year’s conference will offer 30 workshops. Topics will include conservation planning; farmland conservation; wildlife habitats and species; legal issues; “creative ways to connect,” and more. Additionally, the event provides networking opportunities with colleagues and practitioners in land conservation. For more information, go to savingspecialplaces.org.

Lecture series celebrates N.H.’s natural resources

Wildflowers, our native song dog (the eastern coyote), log driving, and bogs and ferns are the subject of four different programs in the 2018 Cottrell-Baldwin Environmental Lecture Series that starts March 20th at Fox Forest in Hillsborough.

The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests and the Caroline A. Fox Research & Demonstration Forest co-sponsor the presentations:

  • Tuesday, March 20, 2018 – Wildflowers of New England with Ted Elliman, New England Wildflower Society botanist and author.
  • Tuesday, March 27, 2018 – The Real Eastern Coyote with Chris Schadler, wildlife biologist specializing in wild candis.
  • Tuesday, April 3, 2018 – Log Drives of the Connecticut River Valley with Helen Pike, journalist and author.
  • Tuesday, April 10, 2018 – Bogs & Ferns with Dr. Ronald B. Davis, photographer and author.

All programs start at 7 p.m. and are open to the public free of charge. For more information, go to forestsociety.org/thingstodo.

Campaign underway to protect Andrew Brook trailhead

Lake Solitude_ForestSociety

Overlooking Lake Solitude at Mt. Sunapee State Park. Photo credit: Jack Savage, courtesy of Forest Society.

The Forest Society is seeking your help to permanently protect the trailhead of the Andrew Brook Trail, a favorite hiking trail to Lake Solitude and the White Ledges at Mt. Sunapee State Park.

See Current Forest Society projects.

Download/view Andrew Brook Trailhead flyer 12-14-15 (2MB)

“The owner of a 33-acre property that hosts the trailhead, off Newbury’s Mountain Road, has agreed to sell it to the Forest Society. Now we must raise the $110,000 needed to acquire the land, cover transaction costs, improve the trailhead and steward the property, and we hope you will give a donation to help,” the society release states.

Map courtesy of the Forest Society. Click on map to enlarge.

Map provided by the Forest Society.

The Andrew Brook Trail is beloved by many hikers as a sweet ascent along a babbling brook that you rock hop across as you climb through a beech, birch and maple forest. It climbs for two miles before reaching Lake Solitude, a pristine pond surrounded by conifers. It then continues to the White Ledges area on the way to Mt. Sunapee’s summit.

Additionally, conserving this parcel will help protect water quality of Andrew Brook and feeder streams in the area, provide high-quality wildlife habitat and enlarge the surrounding block of conserved land including the Andrew Brook Forest and Sunapee and Pillsbury state parks.

“In 2006, the Forest Society led a campaign to purchase a conservation easement on 1,100 acres of land on the eastern slope of Mt. Sunapee,” states the Forest Society. “This easement protects the middle section of the Andrew Brook Trail and was a huge collaborative success celebrated by partners including the Newbury Conservation Commission, Highlanders, the Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway, Friends of Mt. Sunapee and the Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway. The trailhead, however, remained in private ownership and unprotected, and it has now been put up for sale.”

For more information, contact Susanne Kibler-Hacker at the Forest Society, 603-224-9945, or via e-mail at skh@forestsociety.org.

2015 NH Wildlife Action Plan provides new data and maps

FG_WAP_2015_goshen8x11habitat

Shown here: maps for Goshen and Newbury, NH. Click on maps to enlarge.

FG_WAP_2015_goshen8x11scoring

FG_WAP_2015_newbury8x11scoringThe NH Wildlife Action Plan has been updated and there is new data and information now available including new Wildlife Habitat maps. Check out NH Fish & Game for town maps showing the “highest ranked wildlife habitat by eccological condition.”

The 2015 Wildlife Action Plan is a blueprint for conserving Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) and their habitats in New Hampshire. New Hampshire’s Plan identifies 169 SGCN, which represent a broad array of wildlife, and it focuses on the 27 habitats that support these species, such as lowland spruce-fir forest, salt marsh, shrublands, warm water lakes and ponds, vernal pools, and many others. – NH Fish and Game via http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/wildlife/wap.html

F&G is hosting workshops around the state to explain what’s new in the 2015 plan. Registration information is available via: www.wildlife.state.nh.us/wildlife/wap-events.html.

Share your interest in protecting important wildlife habitat on and around Mount Sunapee. Contact FOMS.

Copyright 2019 Friends of Mount Sunapee