Archive | Environment

Sept. 4 in Newbury: Everlasting Forests, The Mount Sunapee Story

 

A presentation of Everlasting Forest, The Mount Sunapee Story will be held on Wednesday, September 4 at 6 p.m. at the Veterans Hall, 944 Route 103, Newbury, N.H. The program is open to the public free of charge.

Sponsored by the Friends of Mount Sunapee (FOMS) and the Newbury Library, the program will include a PowerPoint presentation by FOMS President Steve Russell with discussion to follow.

Mount Sunapee forests tell a fascinating story.

“From its beginning as the Forest Society’s first forest reservation in 1911 to its designation as the only exemplary natural community system of its type by the state of New Hampshire, the forest on Mount Sunapee is an irreplaceable part of New Hampshire’s history and natural heritage,” says Russell.

At Mount Sunapee State Park, the state identified a 484-acre exemplary natural community system that includes rare old forest. These old forests represent valuable and endangered ecological systems and are extremely rare, representing less than one-tenth of one percent of New Hampshire forests.

FOMS advocates for the protection of the exemplary, old forest on Mount Sunapee.

For additional program information, contact FOMS.

Visit the FOMS Natural Heritage page for forest information and state studies.

Protect Our Winters comes to NH

Protect Our Winters is coming to New Hampshire.

POW, an international group of outdoor enthusiasts and climate activists, will work this year in New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine.

We’re coming to you [New Hampshire] this year to get to know your community and learn about all of the great outdoor opportunities your state has to offer,” wrote Anja Semanco for POW. “Nearly 70 percent of New Hampshire residents participate in outdoor recreation every year. With an $8.7 billion outdoor rec economy, it’s time to talk climate change and take climate action.”

Read the POW blog post “What we’re working on in 2019” via https://protectourwinters.org/what-were-working-on-in-2019/

If you are a climate activist or want to join a local climate action group, we’d like to hear from you.

CONTACT FOMS

Upcoming lectures focus on NH forests, loons, and then geology

The annual Cottrell-Baldwin Environmental Lecture Series is underway at the Caroline A. Fox Research and Demonstration Forest, 309 Center Road, Hillsborough. The upcoming lectures take place from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. and are open to the public free of charge.

  • Tuesday, March 26: “The Original Forests of New Hampshire” by Charles Cogsbill, forest ecologist and co-author of “The Changing Nature of the Maine Woods”
  • Tuesday, April 2: “New Hampshire’s Loons” by Harry Vogel, senior biologist and executive director of the Loon Preservation Committee
  • Tuesday, April 9: “More than Granite…An Introduction to New Hampshire’s Geology” by Frederick “Rick” Chormann, New Hampshire state geologist

More information is available via the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests event page: From the Ground Up.

The lecture series is co-sponsored by the Forest Society and New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.

Birds of Wendell Marsh South slideshow and hike on Aug. 30

Birds of Wendell Marsh South, a slideshow and hike led by Steve Hale of Open Word Explorers, will be held on Thursday, August 30, in Sunapee. The presentation starts at 5:30 pm at the Abbott Library. A hike of Wendell Marsh South follows at 7:00 pm. The program sponsors are the Ausbon Sargent Land Preservation Trust and Abbott Library. For sign up information, visit Abbott Library. RSVP by August 28.

Land protection: Wendell Marsh in Sunapee

The protection of the Wendell Marsh area in Sunapee has been a focus of the conservation efforts for many years. Earlier this summer (June 2018), the Ausbon Sargent Land Preservation Trust announced that 40 acres of undeveloped land, which includes a significant portion of the marsh habitat, had been preserved.

NH Fish and Game began the conservation efforts in this area in the 1960’s. They protected the 10-acre Wendell Marsh Wildlife Area, identified as a high priority for conservation by the Town of Sunapee due to its pristine wetland habitat for waterfowl, wading birds, and other wildlife, as well as for water quality protection.

In 2013 Ausbon Sargent partnered with the Town of Sunapee’s Conservation Commission to protect 136 acres (Wendell Marsh North) followed, in 2015, with an additional 143 acres (Wendell Marsh South.) Read more…

 

‘The primeval forest of Mount Sunapee’

Conservation ecologist Chris Kane, on June 30, 2018, led a hike at Mount Sunapee State Park, where he shared his knowledge of the area’s rare ancient forest.

Courtesy of the Eagle Times, July 28, 2018, this article by Steve Russell, president of Friends of Mount Sunapee, reports on a recent hike with conservation ecologist Chris Kane.

“Mount Sunapee contains as much as 10 percent of all the known ancient forest in New Hampshire, and the great majority south of the White Mountains.” – Chris Kane, June 30, 2018

In a walk through time into a forest never logged or otherwise affected by human endeavors, Chris Kane, conservation ecologist, led our small group of hikers last weekend into Mount Sunapee State Park’s primeval forest. Over the course of a three-and-a-half-hour journey, we hikers heard this naturalist identify and interpret the complexity of Sunapee’s ancient forests…

So, like those who were drawn to Sunapee’s rare forests over a century ago, we emerged from the forest with a new appreciation for the uniqueness of this special part of Mount Sunapee State Park and with an understanding that these forests represent the last vestige of wilderness in this region of New Hampshire: they are what make Mount Sunapee State Park unique, and we should do everything we can to ensure that they are permanently protected.

Read more via the Eagle Times, The primeval forests of Mount Sunapee 

Or view The primeval forests of Mount Sunapee | Lifestyles | eagletimes.com (pdf)

The ancient forest on Mount Sunapee
  • For information about Mount Sunapee natural heritage and its ancient forest, see the FOMS library of documents.
  • For info about our work to protect Mount Sunapee, please contact us.

Public meeting discusses update of Sunapee watershed plan

Water resource protection in the Sunapee watershed is the topic of a public meeting on Thursday, April 12, 2018, at the Lake Sunapee Protective Association Learning Center, 63 Main Street, Sunapee.

“LSPA has been awarded a federal grant through the NHDES Watershed Assistance Program to update the existing Management Plan for the Sunapee Watershed,” according to the announcement. “We welcome town board members and the public to learn about and contribute to the 2-year process.”

“The Sunapee watershed consists of portions of the towns of Sunapee, Newbury, New London, Springfield, Goshen, and Sutton.”

For more information see, the LSPA event listing  —
http://www.lakesunapee.org/new-events-1/2018/4/12/a9doie8pc5aey9mi9wuiim14luwkvl

The 2008 management plan is available on FOMS website —
https://www.friendsofmountsunapee.org/watersheds/

Saving Special Places conference to be held April 7 in Alton

Saving Special Places, New Hampshire’s annual land conservation conference will be held on Saturday, April 7, 2018, at Prospect Mountain High School in Alton. This year’s conference will offer 30 workshops. Topics will include conservation planning; farmland conservation; wildlife habitats and species; legal issues; “creative ways to connect,” and more. Additionally, the event provides networking opportunities with colleagues and practitioners in land conservation. For more information, go to savingspecialplaces.org.

The People’s Climate Rally is April 29th

The March For Science and the People’s Climate Movement continues with the People’s Climate Rally on Saturday, April 29th! The New Hampshire People’s Climate March in Concord starts at 9:00 AM at the State House Lawn, 107 North Main Street.

FOMS is a supporter and will have a presence tabling. If you can help at the People’s Climate Rally on Saturday, please contact us.

And here are other ways people can help now:

  • Make plans to attend the rally, reach out to family and friends and invite them to join you.
  • Organize a carpool to Concord for the event or to a sister rally.
  • Gather with friends and make posters, so they are ready to go on Saturday.
  • Share event information and photos on social media.

SEE: https://patch.com/new-hampshire/concord-nh/peoples-climate-rally-planned-concord

 

What does climate change mean for NH?

UNH Reports: ‘NH getting warmer, wetter as climate changes’

View/download: Southern NH Climate Assessment 2014 (pdf 5Mb)

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“Climate Change in New Hampshire: Past, Present, and Future” – two studies published by UNH – report that average annual temperatures in the Granite State will “likely rise by 3 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit and extreme precipitation events will likely double by mid-century.”
The reports can be downloaded here:

The SOUTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE study includes data for Mount Sunapee.
In New Hampshire, temperatures are on the rise, particularly in winter, according to the UNH study. The number of days with temps less than 32 degrees F has decreased. Our coldest of winter nights are warming and lake ice-out days are occurring earlier. Additionally, the frequency of extreme precipitation events are increasing.Published in 2014, the reports are intended “to provide decision-relevant information as municipalities and regions face challenging choices regarding future investments.”

Copyright 2019 Friends of Mount Sunapee