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Goshen holds hearing Dec. 7 on Goshen Rec District language

Proposed wording changes in the Goshen zoning and building ordinances for the town's Recreation District will be discussed at a public hearing held by the the Planning Board on Thursday, December 7, 2017, at 7 pm at the Goshen Town Hall.

Adopted in 2014, the regulations for the Goshen Recreation District address "year-round recreational and other uses" within the leasehold area at Mount Sunapee State Park and on adjoining lands owned by Sunapee Land Holdings, a limited liability company controlled by the operator of Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort.

The town planners seek to clarify "Uses Permitted (subject to site plan review approval by the Planning Board)" by adding: "A.4.b19 Anything not specifically listed above needs approval from the Planning Board and/or Zoning Board."

Earlier in the year, Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort installed a 3D archery range in Goshen on state park land without prior consultation with the planning board or site plan review. According to town-posted correspondence on the subject, the planning board hopes that the wording change will prevent similar problems in the future.

"This will be a public hearing where residents may voice their concerns if desired," the notice states. No wording is proposed to be removed or otherwise altered in this section, town planners say. The wording change will go to voters during Town Meeting in March 2018.

View the proposed wording change Recreation District Changes PDF (93kb) or visit the Town of Goshen website for Planning Board minutes (see November 2, 2017).  Contact FOMS for more information.


FOMS and NHSC seek full review of Och-Ziff Mt. Sunapee deal

Before the August 22 informational meeting at Mount Sunapee State Park, some people demonstrated their concerns about the state's management of the park by holding signs that read: "Lease Violated," "Mount Sunapee State Park, Endangered Species,"and "Where Is State Oversight?"

The Friends of Mount Sunapee and the New Hampshire Chapter of the Sierra Club are seeking a full and transparent review into Och-Ziff's acquisition of the Mount Sunapee lease. In April 2017, Och-Ziff, a New York based hedge fund criminally sanctioned under the Foreign Corruptions Act, acquired the ski area lease at Mount Sunapee State Park.

"We appeal to elected state officials to begin a complete and transparent review of this lease acquisition and all related documents. The people of New Hampshire, who are the rightful owners of the Mount Sunapee State Park, must be assured that our state park is in the hands worthy of the public's trust," said Steve Russell, the president of the Friends of Mount Sunapee.

Russell commented at the state-sponsored "public information session," which attracted more than 100 people to the state park Tuesday evening.

Before the meeting, some people demonstrated their concerns about the state's management of the park by holding signs that read: "Lease Violated," "Mount Sunapee State Park, Endangered Species," and "Where Is State Oversight?"

In attendance were state officials including Executive Councilors Andru Volinsky and Joseph Kenney, Commissioner Jeffrey Rose (Department of Natural and Cultural Resources), New Hampshire Attorney General Gordon MacDonald, Associate AG Anne Edwards, and representatives from Och-Ziff, who tried to allay public concerns about Och-Ziff's corporate practices.

However, many members of the audience appeared skeptical and unconvinced by the state's assertions and corporate promises and left with questions unanswered about why the Och-Ziff transaction occurred without appropriate financial review and what impact it will have on maintenance and development of the park.

"The New Hampshire attorney general's assertion that this transaction is not within the purview of state oversight contradicts language in the original 1998 Lease Agreement," said Russell.

"Examining risk and financial security is essential to maintaining the public trust. It is standard practice in all state contracts. This contract involving the future of Mount Sunapee State Park is no exception," he added.

The ski area lease at Mount Sunapee State Park now takes in 1035 acres of public land, forested and developed land in Newbury and Goshen.

Read related articles:
Questions Raised About Sunapee Resort Ownership - Associated Press via the Valley News, August 24, 2017) ---
http://www.vnews.com/Questions-Raised-About-Sunapee-Resort-Ownership-12040817

State officials, hedge fund address public concerns around Mount Sunapee lease - NHPR, August 23, 2017 ---
http://nhpr.org/post/state-officials-hedge-fund-address-public-concerns-around-mount-sunapee-lease#stream/0

Latest News via FOMS ---
http://www.friendsofmountsunapee.org/public-citizen-warns-state-about-oversight-of-och-ziff-at-mount-sunapee/


Public Citizen warns State about oversight of Och-Ziff at Mount Sunapee

Today the national watchdog group Public Citizen warned the State of New Hampshire about the failures of deferred prosecution agreements in regards to Och-Ziff, the new leaseholder at Mount Sunapee State Park.

Download/view the Public Citizen letter here: PCochziff (pdf 66kb)

The Department of Justice secured a criminal plea by Och-Ziff for violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in September 2016. "Central to the criminal plea by Och-Ziff, the company entered into a three-year Deferred Prosecution Agreement," according to Tyson Slocum of Public Citizen.

Public Citizen asserts that Deferred Prosecution Agreements "have proved to be inadequate enforcement and oversight mechanisms" and have not held corporate criminals appropriately accountable.

The letter to Commissioner Jeffrey Rose of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (DNCR) comes one day before a state-sponsored "public information session" about the ski area lease, Och-Ziff, and future of Mount Sunapee. The meeting to address public concerns will be on Tuesday, August 22 at 6 pm at Mount Sunapee State Park in Newbury.

"The State of New Hampshire should not rely solely on the terms of the DOJ Deferred Prosecution Agreement as a primary instrument to ensure that Och-Ziff is a reputable steward of public resources," wrote Slocum. "Rather it would be prudent for the State of New Hampshire to insist on additional measures to ensure that a corporate felon is an adequate custodian of the lease."

In June 2017, the DNCR commissioner and N.H. attorney general revealed that Och-Ziff, a New York-based hedge fund, was the new leaseholder at Mount Sunapee. According to N.H. registry filings, Och-Ziff took over the ski area lease April 6, 2017.

In September 2016, the U.S. Dept. of Justice and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission sanctioned Och-Ziff under the provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, resulting in civil and criminal fines totaling $412 million.

At the time, Public Citizen reported, "Och-Ziff engaged in a massive bribery scheme in numerous African countries, over a period of years, with the direct involvement of high-level officials. It did not self-disclose its illegal activities and was slow to cooperate fully in the early stages of the government’s investigation."

An enforcement officer for the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission stated, “Och-Ziff engaged in complicated, far-reaching schemes to get special access and secure significant deals and profits through corruption,” according to the New York Times (October 2016).

The ski area lease at Mount Sunapee State Park takes in approximately 1,135 acres (public land) in Newbury and Goshen, which includes ancient forest, exemplary natural communities, public hiking trails and recreational facilities and infrastructure. DNCR is the state agency responsible for managing N.H. state parks.


Public session to address Och-Ziff and plans for future at Mount Sunapee

Mark your calendar. "Information about Och-Ziff and plans for the future at Mount Sunapee" will be presented at a public meeting held at Mount Sunapee State Park on August 22, 2017, at 6 pm.

According to the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (DNCR), Division of Parks and Recreation, the "public informational session" pertains "to the lease holder of the Lease and Operating Agreement for Mount Sunapee State Park ski area."

In June, state wide newspapers reported on Och-Ziff taking over the ski area lease at Mount Sunapee. The Concord Monitor reported:

After bribery schemes in Africa led the U.S. government to fine the new operator of Mount Sunapee Resort $412 million last year – one of the biggest penalties ever issued under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act – the New Hampshire attorney general wants to hold a public information meeting about plans for the resort. --- via Concord Monitor (June 7, 2017)

At the time, the Union Leader reported that Attorney General Gordon McDonald "said the deal between Och-Ziff [the new operator] and CNL was structured to avoid triggering the state’s right to intervene."

Earlier in the year, Friends of Mount Sunapee (FOMS) communicated to Commissioner Jeffrey Rose concerns about Och-Ziff taking over the lease. Rose oversees the agency responsible for management of New Hampshire's state parks.

"In recognition of the State's responsibilities in the oversight and management of Mount Sunapee State Park, we urge the State to seek a leaseholder that meets ethical and financial standards that inspire public confidence and trust," FOMS wrote the commissioner.

Information Session at Mount Sunapee State Park

When: Tuesday, August 22, 2017, at 6 p.m.

Where: Mount Sunapee Resort’s Sunapee Lodge located at Mount Sunapee State Park in Newbury, NH.

See DNCR notice: Rose Mt Sunapee Public Info Session scheduled for 082217  (pdf 26kb)

 


Newbury Master Plan: Updated and ready for review

The Newbury Planning Board is accepting public input through July 11, 2017, on the town's revised Master Plan, and will consider adoption of the final Master Plan at its next regularly scheduled meeting on Tuesday, July 18, 2017, at 7 p.m.

Comment on the Master Plan, Envision Newbury 2027, can be submitted to Newbury Land Use Coordinator Patricia Sweet-MacDonald.

The plan and contact information are available on the Town of Newbury website.

Or download the draft Master Plan here: mpdraft4.2_6.16.17_xs (pdf 7MB).


NH splits up DRED resources and economic development agency

The New Hampshire budget and Committee of Conference Report contain provisions that have received little notice: the immediate break-up of DRED, the Department of Resources and Economic Development. The split of DRED's four divisions -- economic development, parks and recreation, forests and lands, and travel and tourism -- is effective July 1, 2017.

A new Department of Business and Economic Affairs will include economic development and travel and tourism.

A Department of Natural and Cultural Resources will now include the divisions of parks and recreation;  forests and lands; libraries; arts; film and digital media; and historical resources, which shall also be known as the state historic preservation office.

Governor Chris Sununu sought, and legislators approved the split contained in the Committee of Conference Report (HB5 517) and appropriations (contained in HB 144).

If you can help the Friends of Mount Sunapee (FOMS) with analysis and coverage of this change in oversight of our parks and cultural and historical resources, please contact us.

Download/view the Committee of Conference Report HB 517 Adopted 6-22-17 (pdf 886kb)

Download/view HB 144 Adopted 6-22-17 (pdf 1.7MB)

Public policy and public lands: FOMS believes the State's primary responsibility at Mount Sunapee State Park is to serve as guardian of the public interest and to deny efforts that undermine the essential conservation and public recreational values for which the park fundamentally exists to provide. We support the wise and thoughtful use of our public parks and forested lands so as to protect their natural heritage for future generations.

Newbury to hold hearing on master plan update: Envision Newbury 2027

The Newbury Planning Board will hold a public hearing on Thursday, June 29, 2017, at 7:00 p.m. in the Newbury Town Offices to review and discuss the Adoption of 2017 Master Plan Update. A hard copy of the Draft 2017 Master Plan entitled Envision Newbury 2027 is available for public review at the Town Office Building and at the Newbury Public Library (during regular business hours) and available for review on the Town of Newbury website https://www.newburynh.org/newbury-master-plan.

The vision, goals and recommendations contained in this Master Plan are designed to guide and aid the Planning Board and other Town boards in performing their respective duties with the overall goal of accomplishing coordinated and harmonious development of the Town of Newbury, New Hampshire.


Documents involving Sunapee ski lease sale to Och-Ziff

The Friends of Mount Sunapee continues to gather and make available via its website information about the sale of the ski area lease at Mount Sunapee State Park to the criminally sanctioned hedge fund Och-Ziff. The ownership change and a $251 million Leasehold Mortgage, which now encumbers the state-owned ski area at Mount Sunapee, occurred in April without review by the Executive Council.

The FOMS library of news articles and registry filings now include the following documents, all dated April 6, 2017: a Quit Claim Deed; $251 Leasehold Mortgage; and Subordination, Non-Disturbance, and Attornment Agreement.

Go to http://www.friendsofmountsunapee.org/jwl-utmce-widget/sale-of-lease-at-mount-sunapee-registry-filings-state-docs/

or http://bit.ly/2rJKM9g

See related articles and industry press releases.

See related Lessor Estoppel and AG/DRED Memo

If you have information to share or can help with analysis, please contact FOMS.

Responsibilities of the Executive Council include to approve contracts with a value greater than $25,000 and to assure "all major executive branch business is conducted in public with the press present."


June 19 deadline for comment on ski area's annual plan

Public comment on the Annual Operating Plan 2017-18 for the ski area at Mount Sunapee State Park can be submitted by June 19, 2017, to the Dept. of Resources and Economic Development, the agency that oversees NH's state parks. The resort operator gave a brief overview of the AOP at the Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee meeting on May 31, 2017.

View/download the AOP here: MSR-AOP-2017-2018-Final (pdf 6MB)

Written public comment due by June 19, 2017 at 4 p.m.

Mail to:
Commissioner Jeffrey J. Rose
RE: Mt. Sunapee AOP 2017-18
Dept. Resources & Economic Development
172 Pembroke Rd
Concord NH 03301

Email to: MountSunapeeComments@dred.nh.gov

http://www.friendsofmountsunapee.org/mount-sunapee-advisory-group-to-review-annual-plan-for-ski-area-on-may-31/


Sunapee's new leaseholder fined millions for bribery. Officials now say State cannot intervene.

The Union Leader reports: "Sunapee's new leaseholder fined millions in bribery case" and "... the deal between Och-Ziff and CNL was structured to avoid triggering the state’s right to intervene."

"MacDonald [NH's attorney general] said the terms of the lease agreement allow the state to intervene if the company holding the lease decides to sell or transfer it to someone else, but no provision was made for the state to intervene if the company holding the lease is bought by another company."

See http://www.unionleader.com/business/Sunapees-new-leaseholder-fined-millions-in-bribery-case-06092017

On June 7, 2017, Attorney General Gordon MacDonald and Commissioner Jeffrey Rose, Department of Resources and Economic Development, issued a memo on the subject.

See NH AG DRED Mt Sunapee Ski Area Memo 2017June7 (pdf 1.2MB)

If you have questions or information to share, please contact us.

Update 06/17/2017 - The memo of June 7, 2017, by NH's attorney general and DRED commissioner referenced a Lessor Estoppel (signed in September 2016). See CNL Ski - Ground Lease Estoppel - Sunapee -State of New Hampshire (pdf 5 MB)

 


State wants public meeting on sale of Mount Sunapee ski area lease

After bribery schemes in Africa led the U.S. government to fine the new operator of Mount Sunapee Resort $412 million last year – one of the biggest penalties ever issued under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act – the New Hampshire attorney general wants to hold a public information meeting about plans for the resort. - via Concord Monitor

See http://www.concordmonitor.com/sunapee-ski-area-sale-10567921

See FOMS homepage alert: What is Och-Ziff? And what does it have to do with Mount Sunapee? Read about Och-Ziff and related articles about the sale of the ski area lease at Mount Sunapee State Park.

Please contact us if you have related information to share or are looking for more information.

FOMS believes that the State’s primary responsibility is to serve as guardian of the public interest at Mount Sunapee State Park and to deny efforts that undermine the essential conservation and public recreational values for which the park fundamentally exists to provide.

Commercial development, driven by powerful corporate interests, increasingly threatens public lands. At Mount Sunapee State Park, we must strongly resist the exploitation of our parkland for private financial gain.

Additionally, leaseholders at our state parks must demonstrate sound financial management and ethical practices that inspire public confidence and trust.


Mount Sunapee advisory committee to review annual plan for ski area on May 31

"What is being planned for winter and summer programs for the ski area at Mount Sunapee State Park? The operator Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort will discuss its Annual Operating Plan (AOP) 2017-2018 with the state's Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee on Wed., May 31, 2017, at 9:30 a.m. at the Newbury Town Offices, Route 103. The meeting is open to the public. The resort will discuss operations and projects planned for the coming year, according to the agenda. A hiking trail update is expected, as well.

View/download the agenda here: MSAC-Agenda5-31 (pdf 24kb)

View/download the AOP here: MSR-AOP-2017-2018 (pdf 6MB)

Read related post...

Protection of the public hiking trails at Mount Sunapee State Park, including the woodland Summit Trail, is a priority for FOMS.

In March 2016, Commissioner Rose (Department of Resources and Economic Development) agreed and said, "maintaining four season hiking on the Summit Trail is a priority. To codify this commitment, DRED, Mount Sunapee Resort and the Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway Coalition (SRKGC) will enter into a Cooperative Maintenance Agreement, which will protect and maintain the designated trails within the leased boundary. In addition to protecting and maintaining the safety and stewardship of the trails, Mount Sunapee Resort will provide annual spring maintenance on the Summit Trail."

As of this posting, DRED has not provided FOMS a status report on the Cooperative Maintenance Agreement. FOMS volunteers continue to follow up with DRED, and we'll post the agreement when made available.

 


Share your passion and expertise

Share your passion and expertise. FOMS is looking for help with its website and social media. Please contact us for more information about these and other volunteer opportunities. We'd love to hear from you.


Mt. Sunapee ski area plans no major capital projects for 2017

Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort has submitted to the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED) the Annual Operating Plan (AOP) for 2017-2018 for the ski area at Mount Sunapee State Park. The operator has "no major capital projects planned" for the spring and summer of 2017.

Download/view the 2017-2018 operating plan here: MSR-AOP-2017-2018-Final (pdf 6.7MB).

At a meeting of the Mount Sunapee (Ski Area) Advisory Committee on May 31, 2017, we expect that the resort operator will give a review of 2016-2017 and then discuss the recently released AOP and plans for the year ahead.

The AOP describes winter and summer activities and includes the resort's proposal for a new summer activity for the park: a "3-D Archery Course" with "12-15 animal targets located in a secluded and separated area of the South Peak Adventure Park." Few other details are provided.

See FOMS State Park Management and Policies page for official documents related to management of the ski area including prior operating plans.

Related FOMS post: Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee to meet May 31

Updated May 23, 2017

 


SRK plans trail work in Newbury on May 19

The Sunapee Ragged Kearsarge Greenway (SRK) is planning trail work on Friday, May 19, 2017, starting at 3:30 p.m. in Newbury. The task at hand is clean up a short section of SRK's trail 14, Chalk Pond Road to Newbury Harbor. Interested in helping out? Visit the SRK website for more information.

Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee to meet May 31

Commissioner Jeffrey Rose, Dept. of Resources and Economic Development (DRED), has called for a meeting of the Mount Sunapee (Ski Area) Advisory Committee at the Newbury Town Offices, Route 103, Newbury, NH, on Wednesday, May 31, 2017, at 9:30 am.  The meeting is open to the public.

The Public Involvement and Oversight Policy for the Mount Sunapee ski area, developed by DRED, requires the operator of the ski area to submit an Annual Operating Plan (AOP)  by May 15. The oversight policy provides guidelines for the AOP. See below.

We expect Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort to discuss this year's proposed AOP and report on 2016/2017 activities on May 31. We encourage Friends to attend. For more information, please contact us.

The DRED commissioner (Jeffrey Rose) chairs the Advisory Committee and its members include the Director of the NH Division of Parks and Recreation (Phil Bryce) and representatives from the Division of Forests and Lands (Sabrina Stanwood), Dept. of Environmental Services (Timothy Drew), Dept. of Transportation, towns of Newbury (Dan Wolfe) and Goshen (Melanie Bell), Lake Sunapee Protective Association (June Fichter), Lake Sunapee Region Chamber of Commerce, Society for the Protection of NH Forests (Nancy Marashio), and Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Regional Planning Commission.

The AOP for 2016-2017 is available here: MSR-AOP 2016-2017 (pdf 7.7MB)

The oversight policy, states ---

The Annual Operating Plan (AOP) will be subject to the following standards:

•  The AOP shall allow public access to the leased premises for recreational and park activities.
•  The AOP shall be submitted on or before May 15 of each year.
•  DRED shall require the AOP to be submitted to the Mount Sunapee Ski Area Advisory Committee and the Town of Newbury for review.
•  The AOP shall describe in detail the following:

a) Types of recreational activities available to the public
b) Ski lift operations
c) Snowmaking and grooming operations
d) Ski support services
e) Maintenance procedures
f) Security procedures
g) Emergency operating plan
h) Status of special use permits and leases
i) Marketing and advertising
j) Environmental management program
k) Signage
l) Utilities and roads
m) Implementation of MDP site improvements (after approval)

• DRED shall notify the Operator in writing of a final schedule of operation no later than June 30th of each year.


Going camping this summer? Get your free NH Camping Guide

Going camping this summer?

Experienced campers know that New Hampshire is prime camping country. The Granite State is known for spectacular vistas, serene woodland settings, crystal clear lakes and rivers, and nothing gets you closer to these scenic wonders than camping.

Under the stars, nestled in a tent or parked at the junction of civilization and nature camping is the jumping off point to a vacationer’s smorgasbord of rest, relaxation, and adventure.

For some, camping is the main event; for others, camping is a starting point. New Hampshire offers campers a huge variety in terms of campgrounds and vacation activities. A free New Hampshire Camping Guide, published by the New Hampshire Campground Owners Association (NeHaCa), is available in hard copy or electronic version.

A free New Hampshire Camping Guide, published by the New Hampshire Campground Owners Association (NeHaCa), is available in hard copy or electronic version. Visit www.ucampnh.com for more information.

For campgrounds at N.H. state parks, visit:

http://www.nhstateparks.org/park-search-results.aspx?activity=Camping

For the Mount Sunapee State Park campground, visit:

http://www.nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/mount-sunapee-state-park.aspx

Photos courtesy of the New Hampshire Campground Owners' Association.


POW releases "Dear Mr. President" climate change video

Protect Our Winters has released a climate change video on Vimeo: Dear Mr. President. POW is a climate advocacy group for the winter sports community.


The People's Climate Rally is April 29th

The March For Science and the People's Climate Movement continues with the People's Climate Rally on Saturday, April 29th! The New Hampshire People's Climate March in Concord starts at 9:00 AM at the State House Lawn, 107 North Main Street.

FOMS is a supporter and will have a presence tabling. If you can help at the People's Climate Rally on Saturday, please contact us.

And here are other ways people can help now:

  • Make plans to attend the rally, reach out to family and friends and invite them to join you.
  • Organize a carpool to Concord for the event or to a sister rally.
  • Gather with friends and make posters, so they are ready to go on Saturday.
  • Share event information and photos on social media.

SEE: https://patch.com/new-hampshire/concord-nh/peoples-climate-rally-planned-concord

 


Newbury planners to discuss 2017 Master Plan update

The Newbury Planning Board will hold a work session to discuss and review information concerning the town's 2017 Master Plan update on Tues., May 2, 2017, at the Town Office Building, 937 Route 103, Newbury. The board will also discuss proposed amendments to Site Plan and Subdivision Regulations.

The town is updating its 2007 master plan. The public input process began with a community survey and two public forums in 2016. The first forum, Envision Newbury 2027, was held in June 2016. (A program slide shown.) The second forum, conducted in August 2016, focused on "future land use."  The planning board will hold a public hearing to present the plan once completed.

See/view: envision_newbury_2027_forum_1_2016 (pdf 8MB)

Background info: What is a Master Plan? See Master Planning in NH (pdf 736kb) or visit the NH Office of Energy and Planning website https://www.nh.gov/oep/planning/resources/master-planning.htm

Friends of Mount Sunapee advocates for the protection of Mount Sunapee State Park for its fundamental public values; conservation of the Sunapee highlands and its watersheds; and preservation of the unique character and natural beauty of the rural communities in the mountain’s shadow.

Our goal is to maintain our region’s essential qualities of clean air and water, large forest tracts and open lands, wildlife, and their habitats, and the traditional methods of enjoying these resources. We advocate for local land use measures, regional planning practices, and land protection initiatives that safeguard livable and healthy communities.

(Updated April 22, 2017)


CNL liquidates ski areas including Sunapee lease

In early April 2017, CNL Lifestyle Properties closed the deal to liquidate its assets including the ski area lease at Mount Sunapee State Park. Och-Ziff purchased CNL’s remaining 14 ski properties for a reported $374.5 million.

CNL, a Florida-based real estate investment trust, acquired the lease to the state-owned ski area from Okemo's parent company in 2008 and the state approved the lease assignment at that time.

What next? DRED says: “When [a lease] assignment request is made, it will be reviewed by the DRED Commissioner, in consultation with the Office of the Attorney General, followed by a recommendation to the Governor and Executive Council.”

See more...

See FOMS Spring 2007 Update


Join the People's Climate Movement

People's Climate Movement - Marches and rallies on April 29, 2017

We need to stand together to protect our climate, our health, and our communities. It’s also crucial that we build a vision of the world we want, and rise together to make it possible.

To find a Climate Movement rally near you, visit the ActionNetwork.org

For the NH's Climate Rally in Concord (NH), visit NH Sierra Club. The Concord Rally is from 9 am to noon on April 29th. To provide support or to volunteer, contact FOMS or the Sierra Club.



Mount Sunapee committee to discuss annual plan on June 23

In April (2016) Governor Hassan and the N.H. Executive Council approved a lease amendment that allows resort expansion and development of a West Bowl ski area at Mount Sunapee State Park.

Citing legal and public policy concerns, the Friends of Mount Sunapee continues to strongly oppose private resort and ski area expansion at the state park.

Screen Shot 2016-06-02 at 9.19.00 AMNo "West Bowl" projects are contained in the Annual Operating Plan (AOP) recently submitted by Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort to N.H. Department of Resources and Economic Development.  The AOP for 2016-2017 and update on hiking trails will be discussed at a meeting of the Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee on June 23rd. FOMS encourages the public to attend.

Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee Meeting
When: Thursday, June 23 (2016) at 10 a.m.
Where: Newbury Town Offices, Route 103 - Large Conference Room
View the agenda: MSAC-6-23-16-Agenda (pdf)

Read the Annual Operating Plan 2016-2017 (pdf 7.7MB)

The AOP for the coming year says "no major capital projects" are planned; all projects “are maintenance projects." Adding a mountain bike trail to the "Adventure Park" is anticipated.

The AOP references numerous DRED approved improvements not yet completed. These projects include improvements within the current leasehold area to ski trails, lifts, buildings, snow-making and infrastructure.

AOP reports sharp decline in 2015-16 skier visits

Last season’s so-called “no-snow winter” and record breaking warm temperatures in the Northeast melted away snow-making budgets and shortened the ski season by weeks.

FOMS analyses of Mount Sunapee Resort skier visits (1998-2016). Skier visits and the number open days are listed in the Annual Operating Plan (page 12).

FOMS analyses of Mount Sunapee Resort skier visits (1998-2016). Skier visits and the number open days are reported in the Annual Operating Plan (page 12).

The ski area at Mount Sunapee closed for the season on March 27th and the resort reported 179,000 skier visits, a 30% decline from the prior season. Ski days numbered 113 last winter vs. 143 open days in 2014-2015.

The AOP provided no revenue figures and did not reveal visitation numbers for non-skiing activities. The resort promotes a “summer activities” program and operates the lodges and facilities within the leasehold area year round for a variety of special functions, which now include rental of lodge space and facilities for private use.

The AOP, once again, recycles grossly outdated information pointing to 1998 wildlife habitat mapping and omits critical studies that document ecologically valuable resources at the state park and within and surrounding the ski area.

The state's oversight policy for the ski area requires (submission to DRED and the Town of Newbury) an annual operating plan, which is due each year by May 15th. The plan is normally presented at a public meeting in late May or early June. This year, the plan will be presented and discussed with the Advisory Committee only seven days before the June 30th due date for DRED’s written response.

Read the Public Involvement and Oversight Policy 1998 (pdf)

FOMS encourages public participation and openness in all policy-making processes that determine the future of our state park and our region.


InDepth NH: Executive Council want more info on Mt. Sunapee Expansion Plan

http://indepthnh.org/2016/03/23/executive-council-wants-more-info-on-mt-sunapee-expansion-plan/


InDepth NH: Sierra Club calls for delay in fast vote on expansion

http://indepthnh.org/2016/03/21/sierra-club-delay-fast-vote-on-mt-sunapee-expansion/


DRED Commissioner releases Sunapee expansion plan

March 17, 2106, DRED Commissioner Jeffrey Rose released and approved a revised five-year plan for Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort at Mount Sunapee State Park. See the DRED website for the plan, maps and associated documents, including the proposed lease amendment requiring Governor and Executive Council action.

See the DRED website for plans and related documents --

http://www.nhstateparks.org/about-us/commissions-and-committees/msr_mdp_2015_2019.aspx

See related reporting via NHPR --

http://nhpr.org/post/mount-sunapee-expansion-clears-major-mogul-trail-approval

See FOMS reponse --

Sunapee Expansion? Not So Fast...

 


Comm. Rose to announce revised master plan for Mount Sunapee

MSAC Agenda 2016March17Commissioner Jeffrey Rose, Department of Resources and Economic Development, is expected to release a revised five year plan for Mount Sunapee at a public meeting of the Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee on Thursday, March 17, 2016. The meeting will be held at 10 a.m. at the Newbury Town Offices, Route 103.

Please join friends of Mount Sunapee State Park at this important public meeting.

Click on image for larger view.


Andrew Brook Trailhead Update

A popular destination in winter as well as warmer seasons, Lake Solitude is the reward of a two-mile ascent up the Andrew Brook Trail. Access to the trail is now protected by the Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests. Photo by John Welch/johnwelchphoto.com.

A popular destination in winter as well as warmer seasons, Lake Solitude is the reward of a two-mile ascent up the Andrew Brook Trail. Access to the trail is now protected by the Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests. Photo by John Welch/johnwelchphoto.com.

Members of the hiking community around Mount Sunapee put their enthusiasm for a popular trail to Lake Solitude to work and quickly helped the Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests (Forest Society) raise funds to conserve the property where the trail begins.

The Forest Society purchased the 33-acre trailhead property, off Mountain Road in Newbury, in order to protect access to the Andrew Brook Trail, said Jane Difley, the Forest Society’s president/forester.

“So many people who love this trail assumed that the trailhead was part of  Mount Sunapee State Park, but in fact it was privately owned and therefore vulnerable when it came up for sale,” Difley said. “Now that the Forest Society owns it, public access is protected, and we want to thank the fans of this trail for helping to secure it.”

The Andrew Brook Trail is a 2-mile ascent up Andrew Brook on the eastern side of Mt. Sunapee to Lake Solitude, a pristine pond surrounded by conifers. It then meets up with other trails leading to the scenic White Ledges area and to Mount  Sunapee’s peak. Read more...

 


What does climate change mean for NH?

UNH Reports: ‘NH getting warmer, wetter as climate changes’

View/download: Southern NH Climate Assessment 2014 (pdf 5Mb)

ClimateChangeNH?Lg
“Climate Change in New Hampshire: Past, Present, and Future” – two studies published by UNH – report that average annual temperatures in the Granite State will “likely rise by 3 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit and extreme precipitation events will likely double by mid-century."
The reports can be downloaded here:

The SOUTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE study includes data for Mount Sunapee.
In New Hampshire, temperatures are on the rise, particularly in winter, according to the UNH study. The number of days with temps less than 32 degrees F has decreased. Our coldest of winter nights are warming and lake ice-out days are occurring earlier. Additionally, the frequency of extreme precipitation events are increasing.Published in 2014, the reports are intended “to provide decision-relevant information as municipalities and regions face challenging choices regarding future investments.”


Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway Supermap is now available

View from Mount Sunapee looking south toward Mount Monadnock, in the far distance to the right, and showing the Sunapee Ridge and Lovewell Mountain (center-left).

View from Mount Sunapee looking south toward Mount Monadnock, in the far distance to the right, and showing the Sunapee Ridge and Lovewell Mountain (left of center).

A new Greenway Super Map is now available from the Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway Trail Club. Price: $10.00. The full color map (18 x 24 in size) includes all trail highlights of the Greenway, from Mount Monadnock to Pitcher Mountain on side one, and Pitcher Mountain to Mount Sunapee on the other side. All feeder trails on Mount Monadnock, Mount Sunapee and in Pillsbury State Park are included, as are section mileages, shelter locations, trail history, water source locations, GPS coordinates for all points of interest, and more.

For ordering information, visit the trail club website store at www.msgtc.org/store

The Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway Trail Club (MSGTC) is a non-profit organization that formed in 1994. It's mission includes trail maintenance efforts along the 48-mile hiking trail and to provide support for their volunteers and trail adopters, and to promote awareness of  the natural beauty of  The Greenway. 


Sullivan County receives grant for environmental education

Thanks to a new partnership between Sullivan County (NH) and the Wellborn Ecology Fund, schools and teachers looking to increase environmental education for their students will find help from the Sullivan County Conservation District in Unity.

Phylicia Schwartz is the Environmental Education & Outreach Specialist in Sullivan County. to provide environmental education support to schools in Sullivan County. In November 2015, the County hired Phylicia Schwartz

Phylicia Schwartz, Environmental Education & Outreach Specialist in Sullivan County, works to provide environmental education support to schools in the county.

A $25,000 grant from the Wellborn Ecology Fund to Sullivan County resulted in the creation of an Environmental Education & Outreach Specialist to provide environmental education support to schools in Sullivan County.

The goal of the County’s Environmental Education Specialist is to incorporate place-based ecology education into everyday learning. Read more...


The work continues to "save Mount Sunapee"

Check out this video THANK YOU, an inspiring look back at 2015 made possible by FOMS volunteers and friends.


Forest Society working to buy popular trailhead for Mt. Sunapee hike to Lake Solitude

winter hiker smaller CDeegan IMG_1868

A hiker ascends the Andrew Brook Trail in Newbury. Courtesy photo.

When the Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests (Forest Society) posted on Facebook a plan to buy a property in Newbury that hosts the trailhead of a hiking route to Lake Solitude on Mt. Sunapee, hikers who know the Andrew Brook Trail responded quickly.

They posted phrases like “Love this hike,” “One of my favorite spots” and “Best way to hike Sunapee.”

“Those posts told us we were working on a project that would make a lot of people very happy,” said Jane Difley, the Forest Society’s president/forester.

There are three major hiking trails on Mt. Sunapee, but only one, the Summit Trail, is entirely within Mt. Sunapee State Park. The Andrew Brook Trail is one of two others that cross private land before entering permanently protected land in the state park. Access to the trailhead has been at the generosity of the landowner and could be denied by any future landowner.

AndrewBrook_MailingMapv5-1

Click on map to enlarge.

The Forest Society offered to buy the land, 33 acres off of Mountain Road in Newbury, when it came up for sale recently, and has a purchase-and-sales agreement with the landowner. First, however, the organization must raise $110,000 to cover the purchase, legal fees and future stewardship costs.

“We are reaching out to the hiking community and friends and neighbors in the Newbury area to ask for their support of our plan to protect the trailhead,” Difley said.

The Andrew Brook Trail ascends along Andrew Brook and climbs through a beech, birch and maple forest for two miles before reaching Lake Solitude, a pristine pond surrounded by conifers. It then connects to the Sunapee Ragged Kearsarge Greenway’s 75-mile trail system and continues to the scenic cliffs of the  White Ledges area and Mt. Sunapee’s summit.

“Most hikers of these heavily used trails have no idea that only the generosity of a private landowner allows access to the State Park,” said Gerry Gold, of the Sunapee Ragged Kearsarge Greenway Coalition. “Thus it is a rare opportunity when the hikers and the hiking community have an opportunity to help purchase such important access and permanently protect that access for themselves and future generations of hikers.”

In 2006, the Forest Society led a campaign to purchase a conservation easement on 1,100 acres of land on the eastern slope of Mt. Sunapee. This easement protects the middle section of the Andrew Brook Trail and was a collaboration celebrated by partners including the Newbury Conservation Commission, Cardigan Highlanders Volunteer Trail Crew, the Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway, Friends of Mount Sunapee and the Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway.

In 2010 the Goubert family of Sunapee donated 75 acres of land next to the 33-acre property the Forest Society now seeks to buy.

Difley said the property’s value for hiking is the most obvious reason to protect it, but it also contains hardwood forest that protects water quality of Andrew Brook and several feeder streams, and it provides excellent wildlife habitat. She said the organization is seeking to raise the money necessary to complete the project by Jan. 20.

More information about the project and how to donate, visit www.forestsociety.org.


Campaign underway to protect Andrew Brook trailhead

Lake Solitude_ForestSociety

Overlooking Lake Solitude at Mt. Sunapee State Park. Photo credit: Jack Savage, courtesy of Forest Society.

The Forest Society is seeking your help to permanently protect the trailhead of the Andrew Brook Trail, a favorite hiking trail to Lake Solitude and the White Ledges at Mt. Sunapee State Park.

See Current Forest Society projects.

Download/view Andrew Brook Trailhead flyer 12-14-15 (2MB)

"The owner of a 33-acre property that hosts the trailhead, off Newbury’s Mountain Road, has agreed to sell it to the Forest Society. Now we must raise the $110,000 needed to acquire the land, cover transaction costs, improve the trailhead and steward the property, and we hope you will give a donation to help," the society release states.

Map courtesy of the Forest Society. Click on map to enlarge.

Map provided by the Forest Society.

The Andrew Brook Trail is beloved by many hikers as a sweet ascent along a babbling brook that you rock hop across as you climb through a beech, birch and maple forest. It climbs for two miles before reaching Lake Solitude, a pristine pond surrounded by conifers. It then continues to the White Ledges area on the way to Mt. Sunapee’s summit.

Additionally, conserving this parcel will help protect water quality of Andrew Brook and feeder streams in the area, provide high-quality wildlife habitat and enlarge the surrounding block of conserved land including the Andrew Brook Forest and Sunapee and Pillsbury state parks.

"In 2006, the Forest Society led a campaign to purchase a conservation easement on 1,100 acres of land on the eastern slope of Mt. Sunapee," states the Forest Society. "This easement protects the middle section of the Andrew Brook Trail and was a huge collaborative success celebrated by partners including the Newbury Conservation Commission, Highlanders, the Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway, Friends of Mt. Sunapee and the Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway. The trailhead, however, remained in private ownership and unprotected, and it has now been put up for sale."

For more information, contact Susanne Kibler-Hacker at the Forest Society, 603-224-9945, or via e-mail at skh@forestsociety.org.


Soar over Mount Sunapee via "To Be A Bird"

Enjoy stunning, soaring views over New Hampshire via "To Be A Bird."  This video by Kris Roller captures the autumn landscape and precious mountain and watershed lands... including Mount Sunapee. At 20 seconds, you'll find yourself flying over Mount Sunapee and taking in breathtaking views of Lake Solitude and beyond. Take flight via ---


Volunteer trailworker and crew chief Craig Sanborn receives Spirit of NH Award

Craig Sanborn, crew chief of the Cardigan Mountain Volunteer Trail Crew, receives a 2015 Volunteer NH Spirit Award at the awards event held Nov. 10 at the Capitol Center for the Arts in Concord, NH.

Congratulations to trailworker, mentor and crew chief, Craig Sanborn, who was recently recognized for his "commitment to service and the tradition of volunteerism" with a 2015 Spirit of New Hampshire Award.

Craig is a dedicated worker and advocate for our public hiking trails including those on Mount Sunapee.

As crew chief of the Cardigan Highlanders Volunteer Trail Crew, Craig celebrated 30 years of trail tending by welcoming new members, who learned the skills and turned out to have fun building dozens of new fixtures on Mounts Cardigan, Sunapee, and Kearsarge.

We tend 10 miles of hiking trail on the Cardigan range and 5 miles on Mount Sunapee. We see to the routine preventive Level 1 upkeep: clean 140 drains spring and fall, trim back the brush, paint the blazes that mark trails for hikers, and remove fallen trees. After 30 years we know how often to attend these chores, so our trails are almost always in good condition. We also build all the Level 2 fixtures on these trails: steps, waterbars, retaining walls, bridges, signs etc.
In 2015, the trail crew added 45 rock steps on Mount Cardigan's West Ridge Trail and, on Mount Sunapee, 60 on the Newbury Trail and 4 on Andrew Brook Trail. Other work included building:
  • 6 rock waterbars on Sunapee's Rim Trail, which now has 20 drains in its half mile length;
  • a 20' bridge with the Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway Trail Club on a MSGTC maintained trail; and
  • a 12' bridge (at State request) that required hauling PT lumber 1/4 mile up the Barlow Trail on Mt. Kearsarge at Winslow State Park.
The trail crew's worklog totals 811 hours.

2015 NH Wildlife Action Plan provides new data and maps

FG_WAP_2015_goshen8x11habitat

Shown here: maps for Goshen and Newbury, NH. Click on maps to enlarge.

FG_WAP_2015_goshen8x11scoring

FG_WAP_2015_newbury8x11scoringThe NH Wildlife Action Plan has been updated and there is new data and information now available including new Wildlife Habitat maps. Check out NH Fish & Game for town maps showing the "highest ranked wildlife habitat by eccological condition."

The 2015 Wildlife Action Plan is a blueprint for conserving Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) and their habitats in New Hampshire. New Hampshire's Plan identifies 169 SGCN, which represent a broad array of wildlife, and it focuses on the 27 habitats that support these species, such as lowland spruce-fir forest, salt marsh, shrublands, warm water lakes and ponds, vernal pools, and many others. - NH Fish and Game via http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/wildlife/wap.html

F&G is hosting workshops around the state to explain what's new in the 2015 plan. Registration information is available via: www.wildlife.state.nh.us/wildlife/wap-events.html.

Share your interest in protecting important wildlife habitat on and around Mount Sunapee. Contact FOMS.


Volunteer trail workers return to Rim Trail

TrailWork_Sunapee

Trail work will continue on Saturday, August 1 (2015) on the Rim Trail at Mount Sunapee State Park. The tasks at hand include building rock steps and drains and whatever other trail work is possible, according to Craig Sanborn of the Cardigan Highlanders Volunteer Trail Crew.

"We'll work safe and build good durable fixtures following the guidelines in the Appalachian Trail Fieldbook. If enough people attend, we'll orient a crew using rope puller and rigging to move rock on straight pulls," Sanborn said. Participants are asked to reference the AT Fieldbook, "please read page 13 and pp. 52-71. Then, bring them with you to help others learn."

"Please don't avoid this day just because you haven't done rock work before," added Sanborn. "Anyone willing to try can learn to move and set them safely, using picks, shovels, crowbars, and webbing, etc."

For more information about volunteering with the Cardigan Highlanders, email Craig Sanborn at crgsnbrn@yahoo.com.

Volunteers interested in helping out on August 1st, email Sanborn prior to Saturday morning.


Cardigan Highlanders: Trail work on Mt. Sunapee set for July 11

Mt-Sunapee_Trail-Map

Weather permitting, the Cardigan Highlanders Volunteer Trail Crew will be working on Mount Sunapee on Saturday, July 11. This will be a day in the woods, along the Newbury and Rim trails, building rock steps, waterbars, and drainage dips that will hopefully allow for the opening of a new trail section on a gentle/moderate grade that bypasses a steep section of old trail, according to crew chief Craig Sanborn.

"Anyone can learn to build these fixtures, and in the process make a valuable contribution to more sustainable trails," says Sanborn.

"We emphasize safety, job quality and fun playing in the dirt with your friends."

To get more information and to volunteer (sign up required) email Craig Sanborn at crgsnbrn@yahoo.com.

See related website: Hike Safe :: It's your responsibility

 

Cardigan Highlanders volunteers to do trail work on Mt. Sunapee

Mt-Sunapee_Trail-Map

Click on to enlarge.

The Cardigan Highlanders Volunteer Trail Crew starts its summer season of trail work on Sunday, June 28, at Mount Sunapee State Park. The crew will get a ride up the summit chairlift and then hike the Solitude Trail, break at White Ledges, and hike down to Andrew Brook Trail. Crew chief Craig Sanborn said the work is to "trim brush and clean drains as we hike. Fix and add rock pavers and drains, and  rock steps on steep slopes, until we decide to call it a day." The total hike is 3.2 miles all downhill. Heaviest tools are 10-lb 4' rock bars, shovel, pick, loppers, saws, hand pruners, and webbing, etc. If weather requires cancellation, it will be announced by email to those who signed up to work. For more information and to volunteer, email Craig Sanborn at crgsnbrn@yahoo.com.

 

 

 


SooNipi Magazine: 'Hiking Mount Sunapee's Summit Trail'

SooNipiMagazineSummitTrail2015SummerEnjoy and explore the Summit Trail at Mount Sunapee State Park. The SooNipi Magazine, always a fun and informative read, delivers in its summer (2015) issue an article that takes you for a hike up the Summit Trail. Learn what makes this area of our state park so special and why this favorite hiking trail is now at risk! Read (download/view):

"Hiking Mount Sunapee's Summit Trail" (SooNipi-Summer-2015 P.28-31)  (PDF 3MB)

You can pick up the SooNipi at various distribution sites in West-Central New Hampshire, or download/view the article by clicking on the link above.

For some, Mount Sunapee State Park conjures up images of alpine skiing. For many others, however, the park represents a smorgasbord of outdoor recreation opportunities - including hiking, hunting, nature study, backpacking, snowshoeing, and more. All are available at no cost in our public park. The Summit Hiking Trail on Mount Sunapee’s west flank offers access to all of the aforementioned non-skiing activities, and is a personal favorite...

The Summit Hiking Trail lies directly in the path of the proposed western expansion of the ski area. As currently planned, the hiking trail will be bisected at least half a dozen times by new ski slopes, and a new lift line will be gouged out of the heart of the ancient forest community. The closed forest canopy will now feature ski runs, towers for a ski lift, and pipelines and guns for snowmaking. The trail will still be there, possibly re-routed, but the peaceful woodland hike that exists today will be changed forever. - "Hiking Mount Sunapee's Summit Trail" by Gary Stansfield

To learn how you can help protect the Summit Trail, contact FOMS today!

 


View Sierra Club - FOMS press conference in Concord

 

Friends of Mount Sunapee is a broad coalition of skiers and school teachers, farmers and foresters, hikers and hunters, business owners and backpackers, artists and attorneys, nurses and nature photographers. We outnumbered the proponents by 3:1 at the recent public hearing, and our numbers are growing every day. We will not be silent. We will not go away. We will not allow one of the crown jewels of our state park system to be degraded by resort development to facilitate financial gain for a select few. Allowing this expansion runs contrary to the 100 year effort to protect a large mosaic of conservation land in and around Mount Sunapee State Park. - Gary Stansfield, Friends of Mount Sunapee

Representatives of the New Hampshire Sierra Club and the Friends of Mount Sunapee, joined by other concerned citizens, delivered more than 1,900 comments and signatures opposing ski resort expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park to Governor Hassan and Commissioner Rose on June 4, following a news conference at the Legislative Office Building in Concord.

Speakers at the press conference included Chapter Director Catherine Corkery, NH Sierra Club; Chapter President Jerry Curran, NH SC; FOMS representative Gary Stansfield; Deb Flanders, a ski racing coach and former member of the US National Ski Team; business owner Kathy Hubert; and civic leader and former Newport selectman John Lunn.

 


Coalition delivers to Gov. Hassan 1,900+ Sunapee comments opposing expansion

SCFOMS2015June4_1200Representatives of the New Hampshire Sierra Club and the Friends of Mount Sunapee,  joined by other concerned citizens, delivered more than 1,900 comments and signatures opposing ski resort expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park to Governor Hassan and Commissioner Rose on June 4, following a news conference at the Legislative Office Building in Concord. (Shown here.)

The two groups began working together after the 'draft decision' by Commissioner Rose (Department of Resources and Economic Development) recommended the 'West Bowl' expansion at Mount Sunapee. The Sierra Club and FOMS worked together during the last iteration of a similar proposal 10 years ago and recently joined forces to bring greater awareness to the plan and DRED's public comment period ending on June 5, 2015.

The draft Mount Sunapee master plan would allow for a 150-acre ‘West Bowl’ expansion of the ski area and allow the operator to retain ownership of the committed land until 2028, with an additional 10 years added to the current lease term. Provisions of the plan would enable real estate development by the operator on land adjacent to the expanded ski area and the park.

The plan conditionally approves land “donations” to the state of 208 acres of land along the Sunapee Highlands, land previously protected by a public funded conservation easement, and grants mitigation with another land “donation” of 52 acres near the summit. The plan allows for construction of a ‘mountain coaster’ near the center of the park; fragmentation of state designated and state protected exemplary forest and direct impacts to the only four-season public hiking/snowshoe trail (Summit Trail) on the west side of the state park.

Unacceptable terms in the proposal relate to environmental, economic and public trust and public policy issues.

Commissioner Rose has not indicated when he will announce his final recommendation.

The Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee webpage: http://www.nhstateparks.org/industry/commissions-and-committees/mount-sunapee-advisory-committee.aspx


Sunapee Advisory Committee meets June 2 in Newbury

MSAC Agenda2015June2

Click to enlarge.

FOMS supporters will want to attend this important public meeting of the Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee on Tuesday, June 2, 2015, at 9:30 a.m., at the Newbury Town Offices (large conference room), Route 103, Newbury.

Discussion will include input from advisory committee members on the Mount Sunapee master development plan and environmental management plan now under consideration by DRED Commissioner Jeffrey Rose.

The major component of the 2105-2019 plan is the "West Bowl" expansion -- ski-resort development that will cut through state-designated "exemplary forest" and extend down Mount Sunapee's undeveloped western slopes in Goshen. A hearing was held May 5 to get public comment on the commissioner's draft decision (released in April) that recommended moving the project forward. At the hearing, most people including FOMS spoke against the expansion and several people expressed strong opposition to the commissioner's 'conditional approval' for construction of a 'mountain (roller) coaster' to be located at the resort, in the center of the park.

Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort will also present its proposed Annual Operating Plan at the meeting.

View the agenda: MSAC Agenda 2015 June 2 (pdf 20kb)

View the MSAC webpage at: http://www.nhstateparks.org/get-involved/commissions-committees/mount-sunapee-advisory-committee.aspx

For more information, contact FOMS.


Sunapee expansion violates public trust says Newbury resident

Newbury, NH, resident Steve Russell testifies at the May 2015 public hearing at Mount Sunapee State Park that the proposed resort expansion is in conflict with the public interest and the mission of the NH state park system. NOTE: Footage was provided by YCN News, but any edits are our own.

View the testimony provided at the 2015 Mount Sunapee Public Hearing


Former Goshen planning board opposes expansion

Former Chair of the Goshen NH Planning Board John Wirkkala testifies against the proposed West Bowl expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park at the May 2015 public hearing. NOTE: Footage was provided by YCN News, but any edits are our own.

 


Sign Our Petition: Protect Mt. Sunapee State Park

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Sign our petition

Protect Mount Sunapee State Park: Say “No” to Resort Expansion

We believe that the proposed resort expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park is a violation of public trust and represents negligent planning and irresponsible use of our most valued natural resources. We implore the decision makers—NH Governor Hassan, Executive Councilors, and Commissioner Rose of the Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED)—to protect NH’s public lands and the natural environment and deny resort expansion at Mount Sunapee.Time is of the essence.

Help make our voices heard.


'Mount Sunapee expansion largely opposed at public hearing' - Eagle Times

Reported by Nancy A. Cavanaugh, May 7, 2015, for Eagle Times ---

Read via http://eagletimes.villagesoup.com/p/mount-sunapee-expansion-largely-opposed-at-public-hearing/1343450

NEWBURY — The lodge at Mount Sunapee was teeming with residents from around the region as the Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED) held a public hearing for the proposed expansion of the ski area. The hearing was led by Nate Miller, executive director of the Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Regional Planning Commission, and Jeff Rose, commissioner of DRED. After introductions were made, Rose addressed the 200 or so people gathered at the main lodge...

During the public hearing, 81 of the more than 150 people in attendance spoke. They were each allowed two minutes to express their opinion. Of those who spoke, 59 were opposed and 21 were in favor.

Concerns over the environmental impacts of the construction and use of the land, the loss of hiking trails, the dubious economic benefits to the area, additional expenditures by the towns and the threat of condominiums were also expressed.

Holly Flanders, a two time Olympian who was the director of skiing at Park City Mountain Resort in Utah, spoke against the draft plan....

A 15-year-old from New London was also against the expansion. “It is not going to do anything to get my peers to come here. We think it is the stupidest idea out there,” he said.

Read/view...  Mount Sunapee expansion largely opposed at public hearing - By NANCY A. CAVANAUGH - Eagle Times (pdf 160 kb)


Citizens rise in strong opposition to resort expansion at Mt. Sunapee

Most speakers (70%+) including many residents from Newbury, Goshen and Sunapee rose in opposition to resort expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park at last night's four-hour public hearing. Commissioner Rose (Dept. of Resources and Economic Development) called for the May 5 hearing at the park to accept public comment on his 'draft decision' that recommends (with conditions) resort expansion at Mount Sunapee.

Speakers, one after another, challenged many aspects of the commissioner's draft response. Many said that resort expansion represents bad economic planning and bad use of our most valued natural resources, and is a violation of public trust.

Speakers asked for better planning and parkland protection and cited a range of concerns from economic to environmental. Others called for protection of the Summit Hiking trail, more balanced use of the park, and preservation of the primeval and exemplary forest on the west side of the mountain, which is now threatened by resort expansion.

See the Union Leader (4/6/2015) article - Dan Seufert reported:

"About 150 residents of area towns crowded the Sunapee Lodge at the base of the Mount Sunapee Resort Tuesday night, most arguing against a proposed expansion of the state-owned ski area. A large number of speakers said the success of the resort has not improved the local economy....:"

Read more via: www.unionleader.com/article/20150506/NEWS0606/150509542

Read Eagle Times: ‘Mount Sunapee expansion largely opposed at public hearing’


Sunapee Plan is a losing proposition for the public

What's Wrong With the Proposed Mt. Sunapee Expansion?

by Gary Stansfield

DRED Commissioner Rose finally released his draft decision on Mount Sunapee Resort's expansion proposal. Quite frankly, it wasn't worth the wait. The draft approval is a losing proposition for the public. What's so wrong about the decision? Nearly everything.

Allowing this expansion runs contrary to the 100 year effort to protect a large mosaic of conservation land in and around Mount Sunapee State Park.

The "gifts" of land that the state will receive from the resort owners under this deal are rather paltry. The 260 acres of conservation land that will be "gifted" consist of 208 acres that were already protected in 1990, using public funds, when the Land Conservation Investment Program purchased a conservation easement on the property. Another 52 acres, high on the mountain's ridge is also included in the scheme. In accepting these parcels, the state will effectively be receiving land that they already paid to protect, is commercially worthless, and they will be relieving the resort owners of a property tax liability. Some gift.

In addition, in 2028, the state will receive the 150 acres that narrowly encompass the new ski infrastructure. In the meantime, DRED will allow the resort to retain this acreage to allow the developers to "meet local density requirements and other permitting and/or mitigation requirements." This last phrase clearly indicates the resort's intentions to pursue residential and commercial development on the hundreds of acres of abutting land they retain in this sweetheart deal. In doing so they will surely adopt the same paradigm they've employed at their other ski resorts such as Okemo and Crested Butte: The real profits in the ski industry are found at the bottom of the mountain. The ski facilities are merely a "loss leader" designed to "lure the marks to the carnival", and to keep the skier's dollars in the resort owners pockets (and out of the businesses in surrounding communities) by selling add-ons like time share condos, dining, equipment and apparel. This is the accepted business model in the ski industry.

The resort owners will be glad to eventually give up ownership of the ski infrastructure in exchange for exclusive rights to develop a slope side ski village in Goshen. Meanwhile, Goshen, a small town with volunteer regulatory boards incapable of withstanding the onslaught of the corporate steamroller, will be flattened just as quickly as the trees in the path of the development.

Speaking of trees, DRED's draft decision boldly ignores NH state law by allowing new ski infrastructure to gouge a swath through the heart of a documented exemplary forest community that hosts trees over 300 years old.

The plan, while boasting of preserving diverse recreational opportunities in the park, allows the developers to bulldoze through the popular Summit Hiking Trail in six different places. This trail serves as free, public access to hikers, hunters, nature lovers, backpackers and others.

And if all of the above isn't ridiculous enough for you, it gets more absurd. DRED has approved the construction of a mountain coaster, a roller coaster on wheels, in the state park. Okemo already sports a mountain coaster, appropriately and ironically, dubbed, "The Timber Ripper".

Rose's approval addresses these issues and many more by using weak reasoning and employing bureaucratic double-speak in an attempt to convince the public that this is a good deal for New Hampshire. It simply is not.

It is a great deal for the resort owners, their investors, and a handful of special interests. The rest of us are left with an impoverished natural landscape, diminished quality of life, and a battered remnant of a state park. No thanks, Commissioner Rose.

Please attend the public hearing on May 5, at 6:00PM at the Park, and raise your voice in opposition to this state facilitated give-away of OUR state park.


Public Hearing on Sunapee Expansion is May 5

FOMSButton_GreenBorderCommissioner Rose, Dept. of Resources and Economic Development (DRED) - in his ‘draft decision’ - recommended expansion of Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort at Mount Sunapee State Park.

Now is no time to be silent.

Please Attend - Add Your Voice To Protect Mount Sunapee State Park and NH's Public Lands

At this Important

PUBLIC HEARING on MAY 5 at 6 PM

Where: Mount Sunapee State Park, Sunapee Lodge, Newbury

AND

During the Public Comment Period

Written public comments to DRED are due by June 5, 2015


Is a 'Timber Ripper' coming to Mount Sunapee?

A Disney style amusement ride -- a mountain coaster, which Okemo calls its “Timber Ripper” in Vermont -- maybe coming to Mount Sunapee State Park. The agency that oversees NH parks recently approved a rollercoaster for Sunapee that will cut into and further diminish the wooded land near the base of the mountain.

A roller coaster at our jewel of a mountain state park? Have they no shame? Apparently not!  - Gary, an avid hiker and outdoor enthusiast.

It looks we're on a fast ride downhill that turns our precious parkland into a common theme park. One has to ask: What next for our New Hampshire state parks! - Cathy from Sunapee

Mt. Sunapee Public Hearing

Help protect the integrity of Mount Sunapee State Park. Add your voice at the Mt. Sunapee Public Hearing on May 5 (6pm). Location: Mount Sunapee State Park, Sunapee Lodge, Newbury, NH.

For more info and to see how you can help,  Contact FOMS.

Check out Okemo's "Timber Ripper" in Vermont, via YouTube:

 


Mt. Sunapee State Park Needs Your Help!

Time to stand up and save the land for the people

Concord Monitor Column: My Turn  - April 25,2015

by Deb Flanders

As an avid skier, who grew up on the slopes of Mt. Sunapee, I find the draft decision from NH’s Department of Resources and Economic Development allowing the Mt. Sunapee Resort to expand to the west to be unacceptable. I know there are many others who are also against the encroachment on our State Park and it is time to take a stand. Please come to DRED’s public hearing at Mt. Sunapee State Park on May 5, at 6 PM, and stand up and voice your opposition! Please write letters and copy all of your legislators.

DRED’s decision includes the mandate for the resort to turn over to the state the 150 acres of private land currently owned by the resort operators (the Muellers), including “all land that would incorporate all facilities necessary to operate the ski area”. In theory, that would seem to mitigate the problems associated with the building of a public facility on private lands, however, the lands do not have to be transferred until 2028! Would that mean that public/private ownership of the lands can exist for 13 more years, to benefit the Muellers?

The Muellers would still retain 250 acres that abut the expansion area, and if they want to develop that land there is little to stop them. In fact, DRED's arrangement allows the developer to use the 150 acres to meet local "density" requirements. This clearly paves the way for residential development.

We can look to the town of the town of Ludlow, Vermont, at the base of Okemo, which has changed tremendously since the early 80’s when the Muellers came to town and started building lifts and on-hill condo units.

  • Property taxes more than doubled when Ludlow became a “donor town” due to increase in property values. Homes were bought by out-of-staters because the locals could no longer afford to buy them.
  • Okemo lawyers lobbied for and got the residential density requirement misconstrued from its original one acre zoning per residence (meaning one family) to one acre per residence which could house a 100 unit development.
  • Most locals cannot afford to ski, or play golf.  Most small businesses in Ludlow are gone, locals shop in Claremont or Rutland.
  • Okemo lawyers had kept pushing to amend permits, relentlessly going for special exceptions on density and height, visibility and landscaping.

This could happen here. Money talks. It would seem that the state of NH is in collusion with the Mt. Sunapee resort owners as DRED suggests rewarding the resort for the 10 years that the operator and the state have been in court discussing boundary issues, by adding another 10 years to the lease, free of charge, which would bring it out to 2028.

After living in several western resort towns, I saw first hand how the character of beautiful mountain towns was changed dramatically when ski corporations turned to real estate investments and started creating theme park diversions such as ziplines, roller coasters, indoor waterparks, Frisbee golf courses and other devices to enhance their own wallet , despite the environmental degradation involved.

Herbert Welsh, the father of land conservation on Mt. Sunapee, worked to “Save Mount Sunapee for all people for all time!” Now it is our turn! Please go to www.friendsofmountsunapee.org for more information.

Deb Flanders is a avid skier and hiker and lives in Newbury, N.H.


DRED seeks public comment on Mt. Sunapee plan

Mount Sunapee Alert: On May 5, DRED will hold a Public Hearing on its amended plan that will allow private resort expansion at Mount Sunapee. Hearing time and location: May 5, 2015, (at 6 p.m.) at Mount Sunapee State Park (Mount Sunapee Resort, Sunapee Lodge), Rte.103, Newbury.

“A lot has changed since MDP/EMP [master plan] was first released last summer, and this is not a final document,” Commissioner Rose (DRED) said in a release made public at the Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee on April 16. A public comment period is now open to allow for “comments, ideas, and suggestions to the proposal and conditions.”

DRED is recommending a plan with conditions that will allow the private resort (Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort) to expand across the state park boundary onto the operator's private land into Goshen. The resort will be allowed to develop and retain ownership until 2028 of 150 acres of expanded ski terrain and associated resort development. The operator will then transfer the land to the state, for inclusion to the state park, by the end of the first lease term, which DRED wants to extend by ten years to 2028.

The plan does not describe the scale and scope of the project beyond a five-year window, nor the build out anticipated for the operator's other land on the mountain, 250 acres that will encompass the new ski terrain on three sides.

Commissioner Jeffrey Rose, Department of Resources of Economic Development, has called for a public hearing on the agency’s draft decision and amended Master Development Plan and Environmental Management Plan (2015-2019) for Mount Sunapee Resort.

The Public Hearing will be held on May 5, at 6 p.m. at Mount Sunapee State Park, Newbury. Written comment is due by June 5, 2015, at 4 p.m.

Mail to: Commissioner Jeffrey J. Rose
RE: Mt. Sunapee draft response
Dept Resources and Economic Development
172 Pembroke Road
PO Box 1856, Concord NH 03301

Email to: MountSunapeeComments@dred.nh.gov

Links to the DRED’s draft decision, MDP/EMP, and reference materials are available via the Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee web page.


FOMS Alert: April 2015 - Moment of Truth for Mount Sunapee

This Thursday, April 16th, is a moment of truth for Mount Sunapee State Park.

After nearly seven months of deliberation, the Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED) will reveal its draft response to the Sunapee ski area expansion before a public audience on Thursday morning in Newbury.

Polygon D 2014OctMany essential public assets are at stake, including "the most significant forest of its kind in New Hampshire south of the White Mountains."

Learn more about the threats and challenges facing Mount Sunapee State Park- and how you can help.

Please attend in person on Thursday.

Mount Sunapee Ski Area Advisory Committee Meeting
Thursday, April 16th at 10AM
At the Newbury Veteran's Hall (across from Newbury Town Offices), Rte. 103

(MSAC Agenda April 16, 2015)

Some important background information is included below:

In the early 1900s, Herbert Welsh, a summer resident of Sunapee, worked with the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests to preserve Mount Sunapee. At that time, logging threatened the mountain's ancient forest and natural beauty. In 1948, the state took over, formed Mount Sunapee State Park, and opened the ski area. Now, our state park and its remarkable natural heritage face a new threat from resort-driven private development.

The ski area at Mount Sunapee State Park is leased to CNL Lifestyle Properties, a Florida-based real estate investment trust. CNL and the operator, Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort, want to build out the resort west into Goshen, where Okemo/MSR own over 600 acres that abut the park.

In January 2015, DRED released a report by its own scientists that declared much of the land at the top of the mountain as an exemplary natural community, a rare and valuable natural area protected by NH law against any state-enabled encroachment or impact.

The proposed "West Bowl" expansion cuts right through this protected area, part of Mount Sunapee's remarkable natural heritage -- "the most significant forest of its kind in New Hampshire south of the White Mountains."

The threat to state and other protected lands

Mount Sunapee State Park was created by land purchased, gifted, and taken by eminent domain for public good, not private gain. The Friends of Mount Sunapee believes that cross border development is wrong for Mount Sunapee and wrong for our state; it will set a dangerous precedent for state lands across New Hampshire.

FOMS  supports improving our state park. However, we oppose Okemo’s western expansion plan for Mount Sunapee, which opens the way to cross-border private development. This not only violates the mission of our park, but will diminish an ecologically important landscape—the Sunapee-Pillsbury Highlands.

Resort-driven real estate development will inevitably follow expansion and threaten the rural character of the communities in the mountain’s shadow. Additionally, other park uses and resources will be impacted. The expansion will destroy the current hiking experience now enjoyed along the Summit Trial, the only public hiking trail on the western side of the park, and it will cut into and diminish the park's remarkable natural heritage including rare ancient forest.

See how YOU can help.



DRED draft reply to resort expansion plan for Sunapee coming April 16

Commissioner Jeffrey Rose, NH Department of Resources and Economic Development, will soon announce his draft response to a proposed master plan that includes resort expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park. The 2015-2019 master plan was released last summer by Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort, the operator and sub-lessee of the state-owned ski area. The ski area leaseholder is CNL Lifestyle Properties LLC, a Florida-based a real estate investment trust.

The commissioner will release his draft reply on Thursday, April 16 (2015) at a meeting of the Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee. The meeting will be held at Veteran's Hall, Newbury (across from the Town Offices) at 10 a.m. Although open to the public, the meeting will not allow public comment, according to the agenda.

The public will be able to comment on the commissioner's draft response at a public hearing on Tuesday, May 5, 2015, at 6 p.m. at Mount Sunapee Resort, Sunapee Lodge, at the State Park in Newbury.

Commissioner Rose will also seek written public comment due by June 5, 2015 (at 4 p.m.).

  • To view/download the MSAC agenda for the April 16 meeting, click here.
  • To view/download draft minutes from last MSAC meeting October 14, 2014, when members commented on the proposed master plan, click here.

Background: The master plan includes a major cross-border expansion that will extend ski trails/ski infrastructure and resort development across State Park forestland onto hundreds of acres of land privately owned by the resort operator.

Okemo/MSR offered this controversial plan—expansion into Goshen—previously, in two prior master plans (2005 and 2009). At the time, then-governor John Lynch refused to bring the project forward stating that expansion onto private land for condo development was inconsistent with our state parks.

For more info, see:


CNL looks at selling ski operations including Sunapee

While the State considers a highly controversial proposal for expansion of the resort/ski area at Mount Sunapee State Park, the lessee CNL is considering an "exit strategy" that will maximize shareholder return.

The ski area at Mount Sunapee State Park is leased to a Florida-based real estate investment trust, CNL Lifestyle Properties, which is looking at an "exit strategy," according news reports.

ABC News reported (3/15/2015): "A real estate investment trust that's considering getting out of the snow business could sell more than a dozen ski resorts from Maine to California that are worth hundreds of millions of dollars."

"CNL Lifestyle Properties owns 16 resorts including Sunday River and Sugarloaf in Maine, Bretton Woods, Loon Mountain and Mount Sunapee in New Hampshire, Okemo Mountain in Vermont, Crested Butte in Colorado, Brighton in Utah, and Sierra-at-Tahoe in California."

Read more via... http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/real-estate-investment-trust-sell-16-ski-resorts-29637514

Investment News reported (3/12/2015): "The estimated per share valuation of CNL Lifestyle Properties Inc., a large nontraded real estate investment trust, continues to sink despite the recent broad rally in commercial real estate.

CNL Lifestyle Properties, with $2.5 billion in total assets, on Tuesday said its board of directors unanimously approved a valuation of $5.20 per share as of the end of December, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission."

Read more via...

http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20150312/FREE/150319964/cnl-lifestyle-properties-reit-suffers-another-sharp-drop-in-value

Rutland Herald reported (3/19/2015): Okemo sale could be in the works

"CNL’s official statement.... said the sale is being considered in an effort to 'maximize return to shareholders upon its 2015 liquidity event,' though selling its skiing portfolio is just one possibility the company is considering. Listing the 16 ski properties on the stock exchange is another option CNL considers viable. The entire sale plan could still be scrapped, with CNL entertaining the idea of retaining its ownership rights."

Read more via... http://www.rutlandherald.com/article/20150319/NEWS02/703199921

Share comments and other news reports on this topic via our Contact page.


Forest Society letter to DRED addresses Mount Sunapee expansion

This week in a letter (Feb. 23, 2105) to DRED Commissioner Jeffrey Rose, the Forest Society addressed the proposed expansion at Mount Sunapee, stating in part:

  • "Our review suggests that the Resort’s expansion proposal directly conflicts with the State’s legal obligation to protect exemplary natural communities."
  • "In addition, ecologists we have consulted advise that the sustainability of this exemplary natural community system within the State Park is directly linked to what happens on land within the larger landscape."
  • "The original reason that the Forest Society started protecting Mt. Sunapee in 1911, and assisted in its eventual transfer to the State, was to ensure that the ancient forests on its slopes be protected for posterity.  As the current steward of this public treasure, DRED should continue the work started in 1911 and use its authority to sustain the ecological health of these forests within the State Park."

Read the letter in full via: www.forestsociety.org/feb-23-2015-letter-commissioner-rose

Download/view accompanying Forest Society maps via: www.forestsociety.org/resource/mount-sunapee-maps

February 23, 2015

Commissioner Jeffrey Rose
NH Department of Resources & Economic Development
172 Pembroke Road
PO Box 1856
Concord, NH  03302-1856

Dear Commissioner Rose:

This letter is to supplement the Forest Society’s written comments of September 22, 2014 concerning the proposed ski expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park.   Since September there have been two new developments which inform our thinking on the issue at hand, the Mount Sunapee Resort proposal in its June 2014 Master Development Plan to expand its present ski operation at the State Park into the so-called “west bowl” of the Mountain, onto land within the State Park boundary and onto private land adjacent to the State Park.

The first new development concerns the lease reformation ordered by the Merrimack County Superior Court in April 2014, a map of which DRED publicly released for the first time last week.  The second development is a new report from the DRED Natural Heritage Bureau released two weeks ago which depicts a system of ecologically significant natural communities within the State Park.

The significance of the court ordered lease reformation is that it adds 167 acres to the original 968 acre lease area (see Map 1 enclosed), acreage directly abutting private land owned by Resort operator Tim Mueller through a limited liability corporation known as Sunapee Land Holdings LLC.  This new, larger lease area eliminates the buffer zone that previously existed between the original lease area and the State Park boundary.  Some believe this opens the State Park to expanded skiing far beyond the intent and scope of the State’s original lease with the Resort.

We applaud you for asking the Natural Heritage Bureau to complete the analysis it started in 2004 on the ecology of the West Bowl area, and we thank you for sharing this addendum to the 2004 Bureau report with us.  We have had an opportunity to review the Bureau’s work with our own staff and with independent ecologists.  Our review suggests that the Resort’s expansion proposal directly conflicts with the State’s legal obligation to protect exemplary natural communities.

The significance of the Natural Heritage Bureau addendum to its 2004 survey of the west bowl area is that it for the first time delineates a 486 acre Exemplary Northern Hardwood-Conifer Forest Natural Community System (see Map 2 enclosed).  The proposed ski expansion appears to directly encroach upon this system (see Map 3 enclosed).  Furthermore, it appears that the existing ski operation has already encroached upon the exemplary natural community system as delineated (see Map 4).   Clearly the upper third of the proposed expansion would significantly disrupt the exemplary system of natural communities on and around the summit of Mount Sunapee (see Map 5) within the State Park.

In addition, ecologists we have consulted advise that the sustainability of this exemplary natural community system within the State Park is directly linked to what happens on land within the larger landscape.   The larger landscape (see Map 6) includes thousands of acres of conserved land within the Pillsbury –Sunapee Highlands region that has taken more than a century to establish.  In part, these lands were protected to further enhance the forest resources growing on the topographic peak of the region, Mount Sunapee itself.

The NH Native Plant Protection Act (RSA 217-A:7) states that the State has an obligation to protect such exemplary systems of natural communities when actions are proposed that place the continuance of these communities in jeopardy.  Because the decision concerning the Resort’s proposal is clearly in DRED’s authority, and because the impacted land is owned and managed by DRED as a State Park, it is essential for the State to act in a manner that conserves the exemplary system of natural communities identified by the Natural Heritage Bureau.

We continue to believe that there are a number of questions regarding the proposed ski expansion that remain unanswered, questions which we identified in our earlier comments. But the Natural Heritage Bureau’s recent report answers the open question concerning the forests of Mount Sunapee State Park.  The original reason that the Forest Society started protecting Mt. Sunapee in 1911, and assisted in its eventual transfer to the State, was to ensure that the ancient forests on its slopes be protected for posterity.  As the current steward of this public treasure, DRED should continue the work started in 1911 and use its authority to sustain the ecological health of these forests within the State Park.

Thank you for your consideration of these additional comments.

Sincerely,

Jane A. Difley, President/Forester

cc:  w/ enclosures:

Phil Bryce, Director, DRED Division of Parks & Recreation
Nancy Marashio, SPNHF Member of the Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee
Brad Simpkins, Director, DRED Division of Forests & Lands

 


The State is under no obligation to grant Mount Sunapee expansion

OkemoProposalThe State of N.H. is under no obligation to grant approval to the current expansion proposal at Mount Sunapee. When the State granted Okemo the operating lease to the ski area at Mount Sunapee State Park, “future planning and improvements” were discussed in terms of being “made in peripheral areas surrounding the current lifts, trails and base area facilities.”

Ski area expansion, as now proposed by Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort, will breach the state park boundary and enable resort-real estate development on hundreds of acres privately owned by the resort operator in Goshen. Expansion beyond the lease area and outside the park was not part of the contract and, if approved, will be precedent setting for N.H. state parks.

No obligation to expand

"The New Hampshire Supreme Court itself weighed in, after years of legal wrangling, when it ruled in 2013 that the State was under no legal obligation under the 1998 lease to allow any expansion of the ski enterprise or the leased area," wrote Will Abbott in the current issue of Forest Notes (Winter 2015).

"The lawsuit leading to the court’s decision was filed by the Muellers in 2007, and it sought more than $13 million in damages from the State because then Gov. John Lynch refused to allow any agreement expanding the original lease to be brought before the Executive Council. In its ruling, the court dismissed the damage claim, on grounds that there was no state obligation to expand the lease and that it was the Governor’s constitutional prerogative to decide against bringing a proposed lease expansion to the council from the State’s Department of Resources and Economic Development (which is the state agency where the Division of Parks & Recreations is situated)."

Download Forest Notes, Winter 2015, via: www.forestsociety.org/forest-notes

Read Okemo's original proposal to the State via a download available here:

Okemo Proposal for the Operation of the Mount Sunapee Ski Area -  1998 April (pdf 2.2MB)

Related documents are available via FOMS State Park Policies & Management page

Additional Note: The Division of  Forest and Lands recently confirmed "exemplary natural communities" in the proposed expansion area in the state park. The proposal's new trials, snow-making, and major lift, as now planned, will cut through and destroy this exemplary forest. This will violate state law.

Now is no time to be silent.

Add your voice to protect Mount Sunapee State Park and its essential public values and to preserve its rare forest ("exemplary natural communities"), as defined by New Hampshire Forests and Lands and protected by N.H. law.

Contact the decision makers.

Governor Maggie Hassan

State House
107 North Main Street
Concord, NH 03301
Phone - (603) 271-2121
Fax - (603) 271-7640
Contact Governor Hassan: www.governor.nh.gov/contact

Commissioner Jeffrey Rose, Department of Resources and Economic Development 

172 Pembroke Road
P.O. Box 1856
Concord, NH 03302-1856
Email: Jeffrey.Rose@dred.nh.gov


DRED releases revised map of lease area at Mount Sunapee State Park

Revised Lease Area MtSunapeeStatePark2015

Click on Map to Enlarge

DRED (Dept. of Resources and Economic Development)  has released a revised map of the lease area at Mount Sunapee State Park. The map is based on the Merrimack Superior Court decision of July 8, 2014. According to the State website, DRED has filed the revised map with the Superior Court.

See:  Revised Map Lease Area Mount Sunapee 2015 (pdf 713Kb) - Original lease line is shown (red dotted line).

In a decision that still mystifies many, including the Friends of Mount Sunapee, the Court found that the western and northern leasehold boundaries of the ski area are the same as the State Park boundaries.

The Concord Monitor, in its editorial "State should say no thanks to Sunapee" (December 28,2 2014), wrote:

"Nearly a decade ago, this paper’s editors met with the leaseholder and his team, scrutinized documents and maps, and debated their meaning. We were unanimous in our decision that their interpretation of the maps and lease history was self-serving and wrong. The state’s intent was always to retain a buffer of public land between the ski area and the park’s boundaries, and no right to expand was ever granted. Unfortunately, in a decision that mystified us, Merrimack County Superior Court Judge Larry Smuckler disagreed."

See: Merrimack Superior Court Order - 2014 July 10 - Sunapee Difference, LLC vs. The State of New Hampshire (pdf 127Kb)

See related information via... http://www.friendsofmountsunapee.org/okemo-legal-brief-reveals-real-estate-intentions/

See related Letter to the Editor published in InterTown Record (Feb. 10, 2015)

 


Need info about the proposed expansion at Mount Sunapee?

FOMSFlyerExpansionTo receive (via snail mail) FOMS pamphlet (Winter 2015) discussing Okemo's proposed expansion plan for Mount Sunapee, email or call us with your mailing address. We'll send it right out to you.

FOMS phone: 603-863-0045

Email: info@FriendsofMountSunapee.org

Downloadable via: FOMS Publications

 

 


My Turn: Forget the labels - Sunapee trees are old - Concord Monitor

By Jolyon Johnson
For Concord Monitor - February 7, 2015

A recent report by the New Hampshire Natural Heritage Bureau confirms the existence of “exemplary natural communities” on Mount Sunapee’s west flank.

The study, conducted in the autumn of 2014, not only confirmed the findings of the 2004 study, it also enlarged the area formally designated as exemplary at Mount Sunapee State Park. These forests are directly in the path of the proposed expansion of the ski area.

Exemplary natural communities are defined by their rarity, size, ecological condition and landscape context. In addition to being rare, these forests on Mount Sunapee are found at the northern edge of the 30,000-acre Pillsbury-Sunapee Highlands Corridor, increasing their ecological value. These forests contain large yellow birch, sugar maple and red spruce. Some of these trees exceed 200 years of age.

Even among trained ecologists, there is some argument over the exact definition of the term “old growth.” The resort operators along with their pro-expansion cadre have seized on this quibble, and while clearly shaken by the release of the NHB report, continue to cling to their mantra, “There is no old growth!” Call it what you will: old growth, primary, undisturbed, primeval forest or even “just some mature trees.” These folks are missing the point.

Yes, these forests on Mount Sunapee contain large, old, magnificent trees, but they are much more than that. These exemplary forests are ecological communities, a complex interplay of plants (both living and dead), animals (ranging from moose to microbes), fungi and soils that are not found in other, far more common forests that have been historically managed (i.e. logged) by humans. These unmanaged areas are the last remnants of the primeval forests that once covered much of this area prior to European settlement. These forests are living laboratories: valuable to forest scientists, for educational purposes, and for simple enjoyment by the public. And importantly, they occur in Mount Sunapee State Park, land conserved many years ago to protect these forests and held in the public trust.

The first priority of the state park system, according to state law (RSA 216-A:1), is: “To protect and preserve unusual scenic, scientific, historical, recreational and natural areas in the state.” Those who want to expand the ski area and degrade, fragment or destroy these exemplary forests can call them whatever they want. The point is, exemplary forests are protected under state law.

The NHB report quotes from the Native Plant Protection Act (RSA 217-A:7) stating that “actions funded or carried out by state agencies shall not jeopardize the continued existence of any protected plant species or exemplary natural community.” In layman’s terms, this is all very good news for our jewel of a state park and for maintaining the natural heritage and scenic beauty of the west side of Mount Sunapee.

The expansion as planned will jeopardize these exemplary communities. This will clearly be a violation of state law. No one can quibble about that. The Friends of Mount Sunapee asks Gov. Maggie Hassan and Commissioner Jeffrey Rose of the Department of Resources and Economic Development to end consideration of the proposed expansion and ask Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort to bring forth to the public a master development plan that stays within the existing ski area, leaves all identified exemplary forest areas untouched and limits its future projects to areas of the park already disturbed.

(Jolyon Johnson is president of Friends of Mount Sunapee.)

 


How do you describe Mount Sunapee's rare old forest?

Polygon D 2014OctQ. - The manager of Mount Sunapee Resort has repeatedly stated that there is no old growth in the proposed expansion area. How do you and the Friends of Mount Sunapee respond to that claim?

A. - It is important to understand that, even among forest ecologists, there is some debate over the definition of the term old growth. Quite frankly, the term can be a semantic trap. The resort operators are missing the point by focusing on the term.

The focus should be on the facts:

1) New Hampshire Natural Heritage Bureau (NHB) identified and documented the existence of exemplary forest communities directly in the path of the proposed expansion.

2) Because of this designation these forests are protected under state law (Native Plant Protection Act RSA 217- A:7).

Profile sketch of reservation

See description below.

3) These forests do contain large, magnificent, old trees. Some of the older trees within the mosaic of exemplary forest communities on Mount Sunapee have been found to be over 250 years of age. These ancient trees are part of an ecological community, a complex interplay of plants (both living and dead), animals (including microscopic organisms), fungi, and soils that are not found in other, far more common forests that have been historically managed (ie. logged) by humans. These unmanaged areas are the last remnants of the primeval forests that covered much of this area prior to European settlement.

4) The forests on Mount Sunapee are living laboratories, valuable to forest scientists, for educational purposes, and for simple enjoyment by the public. And, they occur in Mount Sunapee State Park, land protected many years ago and held in the public trust.

5) The first priority of the N.H. state park system according to state law (RSA 216-A:1) is “To protect and preserve unusual scenic, scientific, historical, recreational, and natural areas of the state.”

What better fits that mandate than these beautiful exemplary forest communities?

Figure 1 (above), included in the NHB study (1999) "Old Forests and Rare Plants at the Mount Sunapee Ski Lease Area," illustrates the reservation's forest history on Mount Sunapee.

The reports states: "The original purchase of 656 acres in 1911 by the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests was initiated to protect land from extensive logging which started in 1906 (Ayres19150). By 1934, SPNHF owned 1,185 acres, including cut-over and old growth forests. In, 1948, the state took ownership of the mountain and opened the Mount Sunapee State Park with a ski area on the north face of the mountain (MacAskill 1981)." - NH Natural Heritage Bureau (1999)


AP News Break: Old forest may derail Sunapee expansion

Read the AP article:

Polygon D 2014OctOld forest may derail Sunapee expansion plan 

New Hampshire Forest & Lands confirmed this week the existence of exemplary natural communities on Mount Sunapee State Park’s west flank, directly in the path of the proposed expansion.

This is very good news for our cherished Mount Sunapee State Park and the protection of the park’s natural heritage and scenic beauty.  Read more...


Resort expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park is unwise

FOMS_Snowshoes_DF

Watercolor by Deb Flanders www.fellscovedesign)

When considering resort expansion at Mount Sunapee, remember that Mount Sunapee State Park is a state park with a ski area. It is not a private ski resort or amusement park, and the park is not just for skiing.

From its creation as a nature reserve in 1911 to today, Mount Sunapee’s public lands have been protected as a park for the preservation of its special natural features and public use including quiet recreation, snowshoeing, hiking, picnicking, and exploration.

While skiing is one of many uses of the park, expansion of the ski area and development outside the resort's current footprint on the mountain is unwise.

Expansion will negatively affect other park uses and resources. Okemo's proposed expansion at Mount Sunapee will destroy the current hiking experience now enjoyed along the Summit Hiking Trial and diminish the state park's natural heritage including exemplary forest and natural communities.

The proposed expansion will open the way to cross-border private development in Goshen, which will not only violate the mission of our park, but will diminish and fragment an ecologically important landscape—the Pillsbury-Sunapee Highlands. Additionally, the resort-driven real estate development that will inevitably follow expansion will forever change the rural character of the communities in the mountain’s shadow.

For more information and to receive FOMS pamphlet about the proposed expansion, contact Friends of Mount Sunapee.

Friends of Mount Sunapee is a grassroots organization that seeks to preserve and protect Mount Sunapee State Park for its essential public values and preserve the region’s quality of life, clean waters and open spaces.

Watercolor by Deb Flanders (www.fellscovedesign.com)

 

 


Sunapee plan for state park is "unprecedented in NH" - FOMS ENews Jan. 2015

Mount Sunapee from Gunnison Lake, Goshen - January 2015

Mount Sunapee from Gunnison Lake, Goshen, N.H.  - January 2015

Friends of Mount Sunapee E-News, January 9, 2015

Dear Friends,

Read the Concord Monitor Editorial against the Sunapee Expansion!

Their editorial says this proposal for the park “is unprecedented in New Hampshire.”

Want to help us protect Mount Sunapee State Park? Here's how.

For more information, see our website: www.FriendsofMountSunapee.org

Background: In the early 1900s, Herbert Welsh, a summer resident of Sunapee, worked with the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests to preserve Mount Sunapee. At that time, logging threatened the mountain's ancient forest and natural beauty. In 1948, the state took over, formed Mount Sunapee State Park, and opened the ski area.

Now, our state park and its remarkable natural heritage face a new threat from resort-driven private development.

The ski area at Mount Sunapee State Park is currently leased to CNL Lifestyle Properties, a Florida-based real estate investment trust. CNL and the operator, Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort, want to build out the resort to the west into Goshen, where Okemo/MSR owns hundreds of acres that abut the park.

Commissioner Jeffrey Rose, Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED), is now considering this proposal, which is part of Okemo's suggested master plan (2015-2019) for the Mount Sunapee ski area.

The State Should Say "No" to Sunapee Expansion

In its editorial, the Concord Monitor succinctly wrote:

"Get it wrong and a premier part of the state, and land left in trust to its people, could be forever altered. [DRED Commissioner] Rose’s response should be to withhold judgment pending more public hearings and answers to a host of questions. Should he ultimately recommend in favor of expanding the ski area, its fate will be up to the Executive Council and Gov. Maggie Hassan. If it comes to that, like her predecessor, governor John Lynch, Hassan should say, ‘No.’”

"Anyone who wants to get a sense of what the Sunapee area could become should visit Ludlow, Vt., home to the Okemo ski area and soon to yet another 'village' of summer homes and condominiums. Is that what New Hampshire wants for its state parks? Read the Concord Monitor editorial, "State should not sign off on Sunapee plan."

Read the full editorial at the Concord Monitor website.

Your Help is Needed to Preserve and Protect Mount Sunapee

Learn how YOU can help.

Mount Sunapee State Park was created by land purchased, gifted, and taken by eminent domain for public good, not private gain. The Friends of Mount Sunapee believes that cross border development is wrong for Mount Sunapee and wrong for our state; it will set a dangerous precedent for state lands across New Hampshire.

FOMS  supports improving our state park. However, we oppose Okemo’s western expansion plan for Mount Sunapee, which opens the way to cross-border private development. This not only violates the mission of our park, but will diminish an ecologically important landscape—the Sunapee-Pillsbury Highands.

Resort-driven real estate development will inevitably follow expansion and threaten the rural character of the communities in the mountain’s shadow. Additionally, other park uses and resources will be impacted. The expansion will destroy the current hiking experience now enjoyed along the Summit Trial, the only public hiking trail on the western side of the park, and it will cut into and diminish the park's remarkable natural heritage including rare ancient forest.

We invite you to join us in our work to preserve our state park for its essential public values and to protect the region's quality of life, clean waters and open spaces. For more information, please contact us.

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Help protect the Summit Hiking Trail on Mount Sunapee

HelpProtectSummitTrail_WinterFOMS"The proposed 'West Bowl' expansion will fatally compromise the Summit Trail," says Steve Russell, Newbury. "The trail as it now exists will be gone."

"The trail, which provides the general public with all season access to the park, will be cut through with ski runs at four different locations."

Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort is seeking a major expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park that will extend ski infrastructure across the western flank of Mount Sunapee onto  hundreds of acres owned by the resort operator.

Proposed new ski terrain and a new lift will not only bisect the hiking trail, it will cut into rare ancient forest in the park.

The western edge of the park is not yet impacted by ski trails, ski lifts and snow-making. Steve and others wants to keep it that way.

It is not necessary to expand skiing in an area where an equally important public use of the park already exists. The use of the park for skiing is already well established. The public also has a right to experience the mountain in a natural undisturbed state.

Help protect the Summit Trail: Here's how.

About the Summit Trail

The Summit Trail, developed in the early 1990s, was designed "to provide hikers with a woodlands trail away from ski operations," according to the SRK Greenway Coalition.

"Development of the trail was related to the early history of the SRK Greenway Coalition, incorporated in 1993."

The Summit Trail is part of the Greenway, a 75-mile loop of trails that connect 4 State Parks, 3 State Forests, and NH Fish and Game protected lands, as well as town and private properties. The SRKG also links with the 50-mile Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway and Pillsbury State Park.


Leaseholder at Mount Sunapee - CNL eyes liquidation of ski properties

Letter published in the InterTown Record, Dec. 23, 2014

Leaseholder of Mount Sunapee ski resort eyes liquidation of ski-mountain properties

Should the State consider Mount Sunapee Resort's (MSR) proposal to expand ski terrain on the western side of Mount Sunapee State Park?

CNL's recent financial picture is one of precipitous decline. It's share valuation has gone from an initial offering of $10 declining to $5.42 on 11-29-14, to 10 cents on 12-5-14. The owners, CNL Lifestyle Properties, Inc., are pursuing liquidation strategies of their ski-mountain properties.

Wouldn't it make more sense to table the "west bowl expansion" until the owner's financial picture becomes clear? Who would pay for the infrastructure of this ski-terrain expansion?  Read more...


A New Year's Resolution: Turn Your Interest Into Action

FOMS Resolve Cloud 2015Resolve to take action.

Concerned about the future of Mount Sunapee Sate Park and Okemo's proposed expansion into Goshen? Concerned about the impact of introducing resort-real estate development to the state park and how this may impact parks across New Hampshire? Take the FOMS New Year's Resolution: Turn Interest Into Action.

January 2015:

Write or call N.H. Governor Maggie Hassan

Here's a link to the Governor's contact page: www.governor.nh.gov/contact

Write Commissioner Jeffrey Rose
Dept. of Resources and Economic Development
P.O. Box 1856
Concord, NH 03302-1856
Email: Jeffrey.Rose@dred.nh.gov

Join Friends of Mount Sunapee and let us know how you'd like to help.

For more information, please Contact Us today.


How to help today: LIKE and SHARE on Facebook

FOMS FB ad_WinterTrees1

A quick way you can help: LIKE and SHARE our Latest News and message ads on Facebook.

To join our web and social media team, please Contact Us.

 


Hassan should say no to Sunapee expansion plan - Concord Monitor Editorial

From the Concord Monitor -  Dec. 28, 2014:

State should say no thanks to Sunapee plan

"Sometime soon – soon being relative in a process that’s dragged on for years – Jeffrey Rose, commissioner of the Department of Resources and Economic Development, will issue his draft response to yet another proposal to expand the state-owned Mount Sunapee Ski area. That expansion, which would link publicly owned parkland to private land and become home to a major real estate development, is unprecedented in New Hampshire.Get it wrong and a premier part of the state, and land left in trust to its people, could be forever altered. Rose’s response should be to withhold judgment pending more public hearings and answers to a host of questions. Should he ultimately recommend in favor of expanding the ski area, its fate will be up to the Executive Council and Gov. Maggie Hassan. If it comes to that, like her predecessor, governor John Lynch, Hassan should say, 'No.'" ...

Anyone who wants to get a sense of what the Sunapee area could become should visit Ludlow, Vt., home to the Okemo ski area and soon to yet another “village” of summer homes and condominiums. Is that what New Hampshire wants for its state parks?

Read the editorial in full via www.Concord Monitor.com

or view/download State should say no thanks to Sunapee plan (PDF 75kb)

 

 


Holiday Greetings from the Summit Trail

The Summit Trail at Mount Sunapee State Park

Photos courtesy of Lydia Hawkes. Click on image to enlarge.

WinterHike_2014Dec16_LH


A forest treasure by Christopher Kane

This week conservation ecologist Christopher Kane passionately spoke out about protecting the old-growth forest on Mount Sunapee in a letter published in the Concord Monitor (Dec. 16, 2014). Chris Kane has been studying the older forest areas on Mount Sunapee on and off since 1997.

Old growth forest cannot be created. Once it’s gone, it’s gone. I strongly urge any and all decision-makers who have a role in the upcoming decision to grant a ski lease expansion at Mount Sunapee to deny this request for the broader benefit of the citizens of New Hampshire.  Read more...


History of the Summit Hiking Trail

WinterHikeSummitTr2014Dec16_LH

"Enjoy the beauty and recreational opportunities of New Hampshire state park properties. Join us as stewards of these natural wonders and help us to preserve them for future generations." - New Hampshire Division of Parks and Recreation, Explore, para. 3, 2014

Photo taken during a hike along the forested Summit Trail at Mount Sunapee State Park, December 16, 2014. Courtesy of Lydia Hawkes.

What is the history of the Summit Trail?

"The Summit Trail was developed with NH State Parks and Trails Bureau assistance in the early 1990s expressly to provide hikers with a woodlands trail away from ski operations. Development of the trail was related to the early history of the SRK Greenway Coalition, incorporated in 1993. A 1997 memorandum between DRED/Parks and the three volunteer trail groups maintaining hiking trails in the Park recognized trail responsibilities of these volunteer groups. The 75-mile SRK Greenway connects 4 State Parks, 3 State Forests, and land conserved by NH Fish and Game as well as town and private properties. The SRKG also links with the 50-mile Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway and Pillsbury SP [State Park]. In sum, hiking trails and the broader conserved landscapes which those trails traverse are crucial to the future of both New Hampshire's self-identity and long-term recreational economy. --- Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway Coalition, letter to Comm. Rose (DRED) in response to Mount Sunapee Resort's Master Development Plan for 2015-2019.


A false argument: "expand or perish"

In response to a recent letter published in several New Hampshire newspapers regarding the proposed ski area expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park, we share this response from a Goshen resident, who wrote:

1. To frame the issue as either "expand or perish" is inaccurate. The current operators of the ski area have provided quality skiing for years now, and will continue to, with or without the proposed expansion. In fact, the resort operators have a large number of "improvement projects" already planned and approved for the existing ski area, that have not been implemented. If improvements are so critical to their success, it would make sense to complete approved projects before proposing a large expansion.

2. On the issue of old growth forest: Yes, New Hampshire is a heavily forested state. In general, well planned forestry operations pose no threat to the viability of the region's forests. What the writer fails to understand is that 99% of the region's forests have been cutover two or more times since European settlement. Old growth forest, such as what is found in Mount Sunapee State Park, has never been logged and is extremely rare, constituting less than one percent of existing forest. The mosaic of old growth forest in the park is the largest of its type in Merrimack County, and likely the largest in the state south of the White Mountains.

In addition, the undeveloped west flank of Mount Sunapee is the northern end of the Pillsbury-Sunapee Highlands, an unfragmented forest block that has been recognized by state wildlife officials as critical habitat and an important travel corridor for large mammals such as moose, black bear, and bobcat.The disturbance caused by the construction of proposed ski infrastructure (parking lots, snow making and grooming, ski lifts, sewage disposal areas, concessions, etc.) would greatly diminish the value of this habitat.

In considering these and other points regarding the proposed expansion, it is important to remember that this concerns a state park—public land protected many years ago for a wide range of public uses, not solely as a ski area, nor as a generator of wealth for corporate resort owners.

Public needs accurate and complete information

FOMS Shopper Ad 2014 Dec3

Kearsarge Shopper - December 3, 2014


Forest Society speaks to old growth forest protection on Mount Sunapee

"... the mountain has a history of protection for the primary purpose of saving "primeval forest." - NH Forests & Lands, Natural Heritage Inventory of Old Forests and Rare Plants at the Mount Sunapee Ski Lease Area (1999)

The full environmental fallout from resort expansion at Mount Sunapee State Park is unknown. What is known: Old growth forest is in the direct path of a proposed new ski lift and trails, according to a 2004 NH Natural Heritage Bureau evaluation of the ski expansion area.

The Forest Society believes the many questions raised about the expansion need answers by the lease operator "before the State considers how to respond to the proposal."

Additionally, the Society recently addressed the State's "standard of review" when considering old growth protection on Mount Sunapee.

One question is how the proposed "West Bowl" ski expansion will impact the ground that is presently in an undeveloped state.  Work done by the N.H. Natural Heritage Bureau (a division of DRED) suggests that there is good cause to further study the presence of old growth forests on the land now targeted for development.  A preliminary NHNHB study suggests the proposed West Bowl expansion will impact old growth forests presently on State Park land.  Ten years ago, a proposed ski expansion into the east bowl of Mount Sunapee was denied due to old growth forests there.  The same standard of review should apply to the west bowl expansion.

There are a host of other important questions looking for answers.  The sooner DRED asks and answers these questions, the better informed its decision will be about whether (and, if so, how) to proceed. - The Forest Society News, November 17, 2014

Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort failed to provide current and complete impact studies in its Environmental Management Plan (required by the State) and failed to acknowledge the existence of the old-growth forest on State Park land within the expansion area.

Related information:

Resort's environmental plan is flawed (FOMS Latest News)

Old Growth Forest on Mount Sunapee (See FOMS library of Studies and Related Information)

The Forest Society's comments delivered to a public hearing in August held by Commissioner Jeff Rose of the NH Department of Resources & Economic Development and a subsequent letter to the Commissioner.

 


Resort's environmental plan is flawed

FOMS volunteers hiked the Summit Trail in October to view the park's old growth forested areas on the western side of the mountain, an area now in the path of resort development. Photo location: Polygon D, identified in the 2004 N.H. Natural Heritage Bureau report.

FOMS volunteers hiked the Summit Trail in October to view the park's old growth forested areas on the western side of the mountain, an area now in the direct path of resort development. Photo location: Polygon D, identified in the 2004 N.H. Natural Heritage Bureau report.

Mount Sunapee Resort's  Environmental Management Plan is Flawed

The Environmental Management Plan (EMP) dated June 1, 2014, as submitted by the Mount Sunapee Resort (MSR) to the NH Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED) as part of their 2015-2019 Master Development Plan is flawed and misleading.

The EMP cites a May 2004 field study conducted by W. D. Countryman & Associates, and states that the study “did not find any areas of old growth forest or areas with 'old growth characteristics.'"This may be accurate, but it is important to understand that it is likely that this study did not survey the lease expansion area, the very area of Mount Sunapee State park that is the focus of the so-called West Bowl Expansion.

It is equally important to note that a Sept. 2004 survey of the West Bowl lease expansion area by NH Natural Heritage Bureau (NHB) did find areas of old growth forest that were deemed to be of statewide significance.

MSR omitted this crucial information when submitting the 2014 EMP.

Additionally, the 2014 EMP states that, according to the 2004 Countryman study “field investigators found no evidence of tree scaring (sic) by bears." Yet, a casual survey of state park lands within the West Bowl in October 2014 by Friends of Mount Sunapee (FOMS) volunteers found abundant evidence of bear scarred trees.

Bear Scarred Tree Polygon A 2014Oct

Bear scarred tree, one of many, observed by FOMS volunteers during an October 2014 hike at Mount Sunapee State Park. Location: Polygon A, as identified in the Natural Heritage Bureau report (2004), in the proposed ski expansion area.

Finally, the Countryman report failed to include maps or any specific indication of the parcels surveyed, or the area encompassed by the self-described “wander search”. The report is neither signed nor stamped, and since Mr. Countryman passed away in 2005, it is difficult to determine who conducted the study or authored the report.

It is clear that an up to date and thorough environmental study of the entire proposed expansion area, by a competent third party, needs to be completed before serious consideration can be given to any expansion plans.


Letter: Don't let Sunapee go way of Okemo

My Turn: Don’t let Sunapee go way of Okemo

By DEB FLANDERS For the Monitor

Wednesday, November 12, 2014
(Published in print: Wednesday, November 12, 2014)

Eleven years ago, many Sunapee area locals fought tooth and nail to prevent the Mueller’s Okemo Corp. from expanding down the west side of Mount Sunapee, with plans to build trails, 250 condos and a base area in Goshen.

Thanks to then-Gov. John Lynch, the plan was not approved by the state.

I am a skier who grew up racing on Mount Sunapee. After a stint on the U.S. National Ski Team, I went on to coach ski racing for 28 years at several Western ski resorts before returning to my roots here in Newbury.

The reason I am opposed to expansion is that I saw and lived through the detrimental changes to the ski town character and the ski experience once the big corporations took over the areas.

I have lived in Colorado (Vail, Winter Park), California (Mammoth, Heavenly Valley), Crystal Mountain in Washington and Park City in Utah. Finally, in 2002, I left Vail simply because the housing became impossibly expensive and the town had become unfriendly to locals, with gated communities and an imported immigrant labor force that kept wages low.

I thought Sunapee would surely be safe from the rampant ski company development that had so changed the character of the Western ski towns. Wrong!

Many would argue that the skiing experience has been enhanced by high-speed lifts, widened ski trails with groomed 1-foot berms on the side so you can’t go into the woods, loud music in the terrain park and expanded snowmaking capabilities.

Nowadays, skiing is not the quiet and pristine activity it once was.

Local legend Herbert Welsh would agree that the enhancements the resort has made are not what he would have wanted for the forests that he worked so hard to save. Now the proposal to expand is back on the table, minus any explanation of what they want to do on the base land in Goshen, which Tim Mueller has bought under the name of several different LLCs (which list Mount Sunapee Manager Jay Gamble as agent).

In the meantime, at Okemo, the Muellers are putting in another expansion to a mountain that is already hacked to bits. Will they do that here also? These are questions that need to be addressed fully in the master plan, as the community character of this area will be at risk.

The town of Ludlow, Vt., at the base of Okemo, has changed tremendously since the early 1980s when the Muellers came to town and started building lifts and on-hill condo units. The economics of the town have changed.

Eleven years ago, a group of Goshen residents visited Ludlow and talked to the locals. This is what they heard:

  • Property taxes more than doubled when Ludlow became a “donor town” due to an increase in property values.
  • Eighty-five percent of the homes were owned by out-of-staters because the locals could not afford to buy them.
  • Okemo lawyers lobbied for and got the residential density requirement misconstrued from its original one-acre zoning per residence (meaning one family) to one acre per residence, which could house a 100-unit development.
  • In winter, it can take 45 minutes to drive through town.
  • The mountain’s sewage effluent is dumped in to a river where no fishing, swimming or drinking is allowed within six miles.
  • Most locals cannot afford to ski or play golf.
  • Most small businesses in Ludlow are gone; locals shop in Claremont or Rutland.
  • Okemo had kept pushing to amend permits, relentlessly going for special exceptions on density and height, visibility and landscaping.

Gamble, Mount Sunapee’s manager, has called this all “Chicken Little” talk and has said he does not see this area as a pristine state park but rather as a commercial ski area.

Whose job is it then to watch out for the pristine part of the park that is threatened now?

It has been said that the state feels no obligation to have a public process on the expansion plan, but old growth forests and critically imperiled plants, such as the yellow lady’s slipper, are all ignored in the resort’s environmental impact study in the 2014 master development plan and would all be torn up by the west bowl trails and lift.

To me, those exemplary forests make that part of the area pristine, and Herbert Welsh would agree. If you want to help save our public lands, please write letters to Gov. Maggie Hassen and join the Friends of Mount Sunapee
(Deb Flanders lives in Newbury.)

 

 


Okemo fails to detail build-out for West Bowl on Mount Sunapee

MDP 2014 Upgrades Map onlyThe controversial proposal for a new “West Bowl” on Mount Sunapee, as described in Okemo’s 2014 Master Development Plan, involves cross-border resort development. Resort and ski infrastructure would breach the boundary of Mount Sunapee State Park and extend from public land onto private land (in Goshen) now owned by Sunapee Land Holdings, LLC, and controlled by Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort.

In their Master Development Plan, Okemo fails to detail their build-out plans for this forested open space on Mount Sunapee’s western slopes, which is one of many public concerns about the proposal.

See maps and read more...

 

 


"Could climate change mean the end of skiing?"

"We must take a deeper look at the future of using Mount Sunapee State Park as a skiing mountain," says Sue from Newbury. Sue shares information about the impact of climate change on winter sports: Porter Fox, editor of Powder Magazine, has a new book—Deep: The Story of Skiing and the Future of Snow. As he travels the world, Fox sees less and less snow everywhere.

'Half of the 103 resorts in the Northeast will likely not be able to stay open, and that's in the next 30 years, which is pretty shocking,' he said. 'That's where I grew up skiing.' -- CBS News, February 27, 2014 -- View the video and report here.

Also, view this video about Deep via... http://vimeo.com/105707058

Related article: Rising Temperatures Threaten Fundamental Change for Ski Slopes - NYTimes (12-13-2013)

Considering climate change,"the question remains, why are we looking at the expansion of the skiing area at Mount Sunapee State Park?" asks Sue "The changes to Our Mountain to undertake such an expansion are long lasting."

Read Sue's letter here...


Family of Herbert Welsh Asks Okemo to Stop Advertising with their Legacy

Descendants of Herbert Welsh, the father of land conservation on Mount Sunapee, responded to the use of the "Welsh family heritage" by Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort in a letter published below.

Their objections were covered this past week in the Union Leader and Concord Monitor.

The Welsh letter closes with:

My great-grandfather concluded many a letter with the powerful salutation, “to a more glorious Mount Sunapee.” Your abuse of our family heritage is anything but glorious, and your plans are antithetical to what he and so many others worked so hard to protect.

 

Welsh letter Oct11 2014


FOMS Alert: Deceptive push-polling tactics reported

Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort, the managers of the ski area, appears to be using push-polling tactics in their campaign to forward a plan for expansion and development at Mount Sunapee State Park. Several residents, in Wilmot, Newport and Newbury, contacted FOMS to say they received deceptive phone calls this week.

One recipient, who received the call Thursday evening (10/15/2014), said the call was identified as being made for the Resort. It first appeared to be a public opinion survey, but then shifted to the caller making assertions and imparting certain information clearly designed to influence my response, explained the Newport resident. He said he was very familiar with Okemo/Mount Sunapee Resort.

"It clearly was a push-poll. And I told her that. I also told her I opposed their expansion plan," he said.

The call also evoked the Welsh Family legacy of land conservation on Mount Sunapee, which the call recipients found particularly offensive.

Dan in Wilmot received a similar call on Wednesday (10/15/2014).

Cutting down the trees on Mount Sunapee for condominiums is the antithesis of the Herbert Welsh legacy. I also told the caller that blasting hiking trails and old growth forests off the top of Mount Sunapee to put in high speed chairlifts to feed private development is the antithesis of the New Hampshire State Parks.

Okemo/MSR are proposing for Mount Sunapee a controversial expansion plan that would introduce private resort development to the mountain's western slopes.

The proposal, identified at the "West Bowl expansion" is part of a Five-Year Master Development Plan now under consideration by the Department of Resources and Economic Development, the state agency that oversees the Division of Parks and Recreation.

Ten years ago, when Okmeo/MSR first proposed expansion in a master plan, they employed similar phone tactics, which at the time was widely reported.

Please contact us if you receive one of these calls.

To learn more, visit: What's the Real Plan and Read Comments about the Plan

 


Herbert Welsh: “Save Mount Sunapee For All People To All Time!”

Who is Herbert Welsh? And why did he work to protect the forested land on Mount Sunapee?

Read... www.friendsofmountsunapee.org/herbert-welsh-save-mount-sunapee-for-all-people/


Local Hiking Trails Need Your Help

Sign up and help maintain the local hiking trails...2014 Oct Q2c Ad


Mt. Sunapee Advisory Committee to Meet on Oct. 14, 2014

The Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee will meet on Tuesday, October 14 at 9:30 a.m. at Veterans Hall across from the Newbury Town Offices in Newbury, N.H.

The Mount Sunapee Advisory Committee was established through the Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED) Commissioner's Office pursuant to RSA 21-G:11, to advise the Commissioner and meet with the lessee at the call of the Commissioner. Advisory Committee meetings are open to the public pursuant to RSA 91-A:2 II; however, such meetings do not constitute public hearings. - Via the NH-DRED, Division of Parks & Recreation

Read more about the Advisory Committee and Park Management and Policies under "About Mount Sunapee."


SHARE with Friends on Facebook

LIKE and SHARE at www.facebook.com/FriendsofMountSunapee

Our of our region's signature lanscapes: Mount Sunapee and the western highlands from Gunnison Lake, Goshen.

Mount Sunapee and the Pillsbury-Sunapee Highands, as seen from Gunnison Lake, Goshen. A proposed West Bowl expansion of the ski area now threatens Mount Sunapee's western slopes.


FOMS Opposes MDP & West Bowl Expansion

Read FOMS comments to Commissioner Rose on Okemo's proposed Master Development Plan including a "West Bowl Expansion." And read the comments and concerns submitted to DRED from other important organizations:


Herbert Welsh: Protect Mount Sunapee for All People

Hebert Welsh

Herbert Welsh (1851-1941), the walking crusader and father of land conservation on Mount Sunapee. (Photo from “The New Gentleman of the Road” - copyright 1921.)

Herbert Welsh: “Save Mount Sunapee for all people to all time!”

Herbert Welsh (1851-1941) was an political reformist, an artist, humanitarian, Indian Rights activist AND in many ways the father of land conservation on Mount Sunapee.

In the early 1900s, Welsh led the effort to protect land on Mount Sunapee for public use. At the time, from 1906-1909, extensive clear-cut logging was underway on the mountain's north face.

"It seemed clear to Welsh and many of his [Sunapee] neighbors that the beauty of Mt. Sunapee was being ruined and its primeval forest and rare plants were in danger of disappearing.... He was determined to put a stop to the destruction." - SooNipi Magazine, Summer 2004 - Download/read: Herbert Welsh, SooNipi 2004 (pdf 492KB) - "Herbert Welsh: Walking Crusader" by Shelly Candidus

The unspoiled natural environmental inspired and moved Welsh into action.

It was earlier, in 1909 while summering in Sunapee, Welsh became alarmed about what was happening on Mount Sunapee. Paper companies controlled a greater part of the mountain and they were clear-cutting and harvesting lumber leaving a growing bald spot pocked by stumps and slash— destruction that Welsh could observe from his lakeside home. Cutting was planned that would leave the mountain bare.

Welsh went into action. Welsh’s first effort, part of his campaign “to save Mount Sunapee for all people to all time,” raised $8,000 and with the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests purchased from the paper companies 656 acres of land and timber rights on Mount Sunapee’s northern slopes, including the summit and Lake Solitude. His passion about protecting the mountain's natural environment is detailed in his writings including "Redemption of Mount Sunapee," which he penned while at his Sunapee home.

The 1911 purchase on Mount Sunapee marked the Society’s first reservation. The campaign to protect Mount Sunapee continued with the acquisition of more conservation land, land to be open to all people for outdoor "recreation and health." From 1922 to 1937, the Society purchased several more parcels on the mountain. In 1948 after acquiring 1,116 acres on Mount Sunapee, the Society transferred their holdings to the state of New Hampshire for a state park.

Welsh served the Society as a Vice-President At Large and as President of the Sunapee Chapter, from its formation in 1912 to at least 1934.

If we saved Mount Sunapee we would indeed be doing this, but we would also be doing something higher and nobler than acting for our own protection; we would be helping to affect our part of the great national work of forest conservation. --- Herbert Welsh in "Redemption of Mount Sunapee"

Time line:

1909 - 1911– Herbert Welsh leads a successful educational and fund-raising campaign to protect Mount Sunapee after he discovers large paper companies intend to clear the mountain’s steep slopes and peak. He enlists the help of the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

1911 – The Forest Society acquires 656 acres on Mount Sunapee, the Society’s first reservation, which is followed by additional purchases.

1915 – The Society’s Sunapee Chapter, under Welsh’s leadership, publishes The Manual of Mount Sunapee. It details the mountain’s geological history, flora, birds and ferns.

1930’s – The Newport Ski Club cuts alpine trails on Mount Sunapee.

1948 – The Forest Society transfers 1,116 acres on Mount Sunapee to the state of New Hampshire and, in December, the Mount Sunapee Ski Area opens at Mount Sunapee State Park.

 

 


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