Archive | Environment

The People’s Climate Rally is April 29th

The March For Science and the People’s Climate Movement continues with the People’s Climate Rally on Saturday, April 29th! The New Hampshire People’s Climate March in Concord starts at 9:00 AM at the State House Lawn, 107 North Main Street.

FOMS is a supporter and will have a presence tabling. If you can help at the People’s Climate Rally on Saturday, please contact us.

And here are other ways people can help now:

  • Make plans to attend the rally, reach out to family and friends and invite them to join you.
  • Organize a carpool to Concord for the event or to a sister rally.
  • Gather with friends and make posters, so they are ready to go on Saturday.
  • Share event information and photos on social media.

SEE: https://patch.com/new-hampshire/concord-nh/peoples-climate-rally-planned-concord

 

What does climate change mean for NH?

UNH Reports: ‘NH getting warmer, wetter as climate changes’

View/download: Southern NH Climate Assessment 2014 (pdf 5Mb)

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“Climate Change in New Hampshire: Past, Present, and Future” – two studies published by UNH – report that average annual temperatures in the Granite State will “likely rise by 3 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit and extreme precipitation events will likely double by mid-century.”
The reports can be downloaded here:

The SOUTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE study includes data for Mount Sunapee.
In New Hampshire, temperatures are on the rise, particularly in winter, according to the UNH study. The number of days with temps less than 32 degrees F has decreased. Our coldest of winter nights are warming and lake ice-out days are occurring earlier. Additionally, the frequency of extreme precipitation events are increasing.Published in 2014, the reports are intended “to provide decision-relevant information as municipalities and regions face challenging choices regarding future investments.”

Sullivan County receives grant for environmental education

Thanks to a new partnership between Sullivan County (NH) and the Wellborn Ecology Fund, schools and teachers looking to increase environmental education for their students will find help from the Sullivan County Conservation District in Unity.

Phylicia Schwartz is the Environmental Education & Outreach Specialist in Sullivan County. to provide environmental education support to schools in Sullivan County. In November 2015, the County hired Phylicia Schwartz

Phylicia Schwartz, Environmental Education & Outreach Specialist in Sullivan County, works to provide environmental education support to schools in the county.

A $25,000 grant from the Wellborn Ecology Fund to Sullivan County resulted in the creation of an Environmental Education & Outreach Specialist to provide environmental education support to schools in Sullivan County.

The goal of the County’s Environmental Education Specialist is to incorporate place-based ecology education into everyday learning. Read more…

Campaign underway to protect Andrew Brook trailhead

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Overlooking Lake Solitude at Mt. Sunapee State Park. Photo credit: Jack Savage, courtesy of Forest Society.

The Forest Society is seeking your help to permanently protect the trailhead of the Andrew Brook Trail, a favorite hiking trail to Lake Solitude and the White Ledges at Mt. Sunapee State Park.

See Current Forest Society projects.

Download/view Andrew Brook Trailhead flyer 12-14-15 (2MB)

“The owner of a 33-acre property that hosts the trailhead, off Newbury’s Mountain Road, has agreed to sell it to the Forest Society. Now we must raise the $110,000 needed to acquire the land, cover transaction costs, improve the trailhead and steward the property, and we hope you will give a donation to help,” the society release states.

Map courtesy of the Forest Society. Click on map to enlarge.

Map provided by the Forest Society.

The Andrew Brook Trail is beloved by many hikers as a sweet ascent along a babbling brook that you rock hop across as you climb through a beech, birch and maple forest. It climbs for two miles before reaching Lake Solitude, a pristine pond surrounded by conifers. It then continues to the White Ledges area on the way to Mt. Sunapee’s summit.

Additionally, conserving this parcel will help protect water quality of Andrew Brook and feeder streams in the area, provide high-quality wildlife habitat and enlarge the surrounding block of conserved land including the Andrew Brook Forest and Sunapee and Pillsbury state parks.

“In 2006, the Forest Society led a campaign to purchase a conservation easement on 1,100 acres of land on the eastern slope of Mt. Sunapee,” states the Forest Society. “This easement protects the middle section of the Andrew Brook Trail and was a huge collaborative success celebrated by partners including the Newbury Conservation Commission, Highlanders, the Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway, Friends of Mt. Sunapee and the Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway. The trailhead, however, remained in private ownership and unprotected, and it has now been put up for sale.”

For more information, contact Susanne Kibler-Hacker at the Forest Society, 603-224-9945, or via e-mail at skh@forestsociety.org.

Soar over Mount Sunapee via “To Be A Bird”

Enjoy stunning, soaring views over New Hampshire via “To Be A Bird.”  This video by Kris Roller captures the autumn landscape and precious mountain and watershed lands… including Mount Sunapee. At 20 seconds, you’ll find yourself flying over Mount Sunapee and taking in breathtaking views of Lake Solitude and beyond. Take flight via —

2015 NH Wildlife Action Plan provides new data and maps

FG_WAP_2015_goshen8x11habitat

Shown here: maps for Goshen and Newbury, NH. Click on maps to enlarge.

FG_WAP_2015_goshen8x11scoring

FG_WAP_2015_newbury8x11scoringThe NH Wildlife Action Plan has been updated and there is new data and information now available including new Wildlife Habitat maps. Check out NH Fish & Game for town maps showing the “highest ranked wildlife habitat by eccological condition.”

The 2015 Wildlife Action Plan is a blueprint for conserving Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) and their habitats in New Hampshire. New Hampshire’s Plan identifies 169 SGCN, which represent a broad array of wildlife, and it focuses on the 27 habitats that support these species, such as lowland spruce-fir forest, salt marsh, shrublands, warm water lakes and ponds, vernal pools, and many others. – NH Fish and Game via http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/wildlife/wap.html

F&G is hosting workshops around the state to explain what’s new in the 2015 plan. Registration information is available via: www.wildlife.state.nh.us/wildlife/wap-events.html.

Share your interest in protecting important wildlife habitat on and around Mount Sunapee. Contact FOMS.

My Turn: Forget the labels – Sunapee trees are old – Concord Monitor

By Jolyon Johnson
For Concord Monitor – February 7, 2015

A recent report by the New Hampshire Natural Heritage Bureau confirms the existence of “exemplary natural communities” on Mount Sunapee’s west flank.

The study, conducted in the autumn of 2014, not only confirmed the findings of the 2004 study, it also enlarged the area formally designated as exemplary at Mount Sunapee State Park. These forests are directly in the path of the proposed expansion of the ski area. Continue Reading →

How do you describe Mount Sunapee’s rare old forest?

Polygon D 2014OctQ. – The manager of Mount Sunapee Resort has repeatedly stated that there is no old growth in the proposed expansion area. How do you and the Friends of Mount Sunapee respond to that claim?

A. – It is important to understand that, even among forest ecologists, there is some debate over the definition of the term old growth. Quite frankly, the term can be a semantic trap. The resort operators are missing the point by focusing on the term.

The focus should be on the facts:

1) New Hampshire Natural Heritage Bureau (NHB) identified and documented the existence of exemplary forest communities directly in the path of the proposed expansion.

2) Because of this designation these forests are protected under state law (Native Plant Protection Act RSA 217- A:7).

Profile sketch of reservation

See description below.

3) These forests do contain large, magnificent, old trees. Some of the older trees within the mosaic of exemplary forest communities on Mount Sunapee have been found to be over 250 years of age. These ancient trees are part of an ecological community, a complex interplay of plants (both living and dead), animals (including microscopic organisms), fungi, and soils that are not found in other, far more common forests that have been historically managed (ie. logged) by humans. These unmanaged areas are the last remnants of the primeval forests that covered much of this area prior to European settlement.

4) The forests on Mount Sunapee are living laboratories, valuable to forest scientists, for educational purposes, and for simple enjoyment by the public. And, they occur in Mount Sunapee State Park, land protected many years ago and held in the public trust.

5) The first priority of the N.H. state park system according to state law (RSA 216-A:1) is “To protect and preserve unusual scenic, scientific, historical, recreational, and natural areas of the state.”

What better fits that mandate than these beautiful exemplary forest communities?

Figure 1 (above), included in the NHB study (1999) “Old Forests and Rare Plants at the Mount Sunapee Ski Lease Area,” illustrates the reservation’s forest history on Mount Sunapee.

The reports states: “The original purchase of 656 acres in 1911 by the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests was initiated to protect land from extensive logging which started in 1906 (Ayres19150). By 1934, SPNHF owned 1,185 acres, including cut-over and old growth forests. In, 1948, the state took ownership of the mountain and opened the Mount Sunapee State Park with a ski area on the north face of the mountain (MacAskill 1981).” – NH Natural Heritage Bureau (1999)

Copyright 2017 Friends of Mount Sunapee